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The Dali Museum

The Dali Museum

The Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida holds an expansive amount of the many masterpieces by artist extraordinaire, Salvador Dali.  While I was in Florida during the holiday season, I made sure to visit the exhibitions, as the furthest I ever made it inside the previous year was the gift shop. This post got buried as I got busy with other posts, like the Miami posts, that you can read about here and here. Although I believe everything happens for a reason, and a little escapism is needed right now. So with this post I invite you to peek into the Dali museum, and Salvador Dali’s world.

 

Surrealism: Surrealism is the form of art that Dali is most known for, although it is not the only type of art he did. The best words I can use to describe this art form are “dream like”. Although as per Lexico powered by Oxford:

 

“Surrealism is a 20th century avant-garde movement in art and literature which sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious mind, for example by the irrational juxtaposition of images.

Launched in 1924 by a manifesto of André Breton and having a strong political content, the movement grew out of symbolism and Dada and was strongly influenced by Sigmund Freud. In the visual arts its most notable exponents were André Masson, Jean Arp, Joan Miró, René Magritte, Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, Man Ray, and Luis Buñuel.”

 

About Dali

Dali was born in Spain, May 11th, 1904

 

Dali knew how to speak French

 

He was thrown out of the San Fernando Academy of Art in Madrid after he refused to be tested in the theory of art and claimed the judges to be incompetent

 

In the 1920’s he started painting Surrealism after moving to Paris and being introduced to this latest art form by Andre Brenton

 

By the 1930’s Dali was nearly expelled from the Surrealist art movement by other leaders of the group due to public outbursts and a personal disagreement with leader, Andre Breton.

 

During the 1940’s Dali and his wife, Gala moved to New York where he exhibited at the MoMA. He went on to work with Alfred Hitchcock, and Walt Disney on different projects.

 

In the 1950’s Dali and Gala remarried, and he entered into his “nuclear mysticism” art period where he combined the subjects of religion, DNA, geometry, and illusions.

 

Dali passed away at 84 years old on January 23rd, 1989. Dali’s final works were inspired by mathematics, immortality and the “fourth dimension”.

 

My Favorite Pieces in the Museum: The museum showed Dali’s range of art as a master of both Surrealism and Classic art. His move away from Surrealism came during the 1950’s as his inspirations changed. I loved seeing his evolution and learning what inspired him during each part of his artistic life. Here are some of my favorites, some of which I bought postcard versions of.

 

 

The Museum Itself:

The museum has quirky architecture, inspired by Dali’s art and things that inspired him.  The “Enigma” glass bubble that wraps part of the building, makes the building itself a work of art. The “helical” or  spiral staircase inside was inspired by Dali’s love of spirals and the form that DNA molecule makes.

 

The museum has a garage for parking, and costs $25 for adults to enter with cheaper prices for students, children, and first responder’s or military. You can also download the Dali Museum app to give you more information and a in depth solo tour. As the museum is currently closed they have their exhibitions online at the moment. The museum is said to have a total of 2,400 works by Dali.

 

 

Midnight in Paris Exhibition:

At the time there was also an exhibition in the museum called Midnight in Paris 1929, which showcased works by other Surrealist masters as well as Dali’s. It also gave people a peak into their lives, what inspired their work and showcased what each artist actually looked like. Its currently one of the exhibitions you can see on the museum website as well.

 

 

Other experiences in the museum: Dreams of Dali VR and the Avant-Garden

The museum has a Virtual Reality experience in which you can step into different Dali paintings. This was a very cool experience and something my art loving mind and heart thoroughly enjoyed. I wish I could have taken pictures of what I was seeing, it was really like stepping into a painting and walking around in it. Experience it for yourself in its online version here.

 

 

It was my second time visiting the garden, as its not blocked off from the waterfront walk that runs through other parts of St. Pete. It’s a relaxing garden with sculptures by Dali, a labyrinth, which I didn’t realize was there, a grotto and other aspects that combine math, nature and art. I will have to make it back to see the labyrinth.

 

 

The Fashion Industry and Surrealism:

Having an education in fashion I can tell you that, Surrealism and the masters of this art form often crossed paths with the fashion designers of the time. It’s no surprise when fashion crosses with other art forms, and it still happens to this day. Salvador Dali and Elsa Schiaperelli often mingled in the same circles and were known to be good friends. They inspired each other to push the boundaries of their work. The Dali Museum recognizes this connection between the two art forms to this day with events in the past with Neiman Marcus.

 

The museum itself is small and is only two floors, but the collection of art gives you a good education on who Dali was and how his art evolved. On another note as per the website you don’t need a ticket to visit the gift shop or cafe, but I do remember them asking to see my wristband to see the exhibitions. I highly recommend visiting The Dali if you make it to St. Petersburg, which is also the only museum in the Southeastern United Sates to be awarded three Michelin Stars. Take some time to walk the city when you’re done with the museum and you’ll see art infused throughout the city with murals and painted electrical boxes.

 

Have you been to the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg? Is it on your bucket list now? Let me know in the comments and on social media.- T.S.

New York Travel

The Vessel and the Shops at the Hudson

The Vessel and the Shops at the Hudson

Recently I made a trip out to see the Vessel, one of the newest attractions in the ever evolving NYC architectural roster. I finally made it out to see it with a girlfriend and if you follow my stories or watch my Vessel highlight on Instagram, you’ll know we walked all the way to the top.

 

It was of course crowded during the day, but less so in the evening. I remember walking The High Line and seeing the beginnings of construction on the Vessel, Shops at the Hudson and The Shed and wondering what they would look like. So I was intrigued to see what it was all about.

 

What is it?

The Vessel is a life size sculpture of sorts. Its copper reflective mirror exterior is an eye catcher for sure. I personally appreciate the color and its reflective façade, bouncing back the images of people as they look up at it. Make it a mission to walk to the top to see the view of the Hudson and lower Manhattan.

 

Quick facts

  • Designed by Thomas Heatherwick
  • 16 floors
  • 154 flights of stairs around 2,500 steps

 

How much is it?

Its FREE people! And who knows if or when that will change. So seize the day and book your timeslot. Which is an hour long. The timeslots, I’m guessing are for crowd control, I chose late afternoon on a Saturday, and there was barely a line. Once our hour was done and we excited the line was long.

 

Hours– Open daily 10am-7pm

 

Can everyone visit?

Yes! I saw families with small kids, and it has an elevator if you don’t want to walk to the top.

 

 

 

The ShedThe Shed is an event space that will be rotating open to the public shows and exhibitions, prices begin at $10 to enter. We stopped in to look around, but I haven’t seen an exhibition there yet.

 

The Shops at Hudson Yards– Once you’re done walking The Vessel and Shed take a walk around the Shops at Hudson Yards. A mall with both mid-tier and high-end stores, health center, restaurants and the well awaited Mercado Little Spain. Created by world renowned Chef José Andrés and the Adría Brothers this is the Spanish version of Eataly, the Italian food wonderland. In similar form Mercado Little Spain encompasses restaurants, bars, grocery goods and more. Located on the lower level this is a food paradise for those who are familiar with Spanish cuisine and those who are just being introduced to it. As I have been to Spain, I was excited to see what it had in store. While there we ate at Bar Manolo, where I had dishes I had never tasted before and to finish off our night, we stopped by the Pasteles bar (cake) to have a scrumptious raspberry crunch bar.

 

While at the Shops at Hudson Yards check out Beyond the Edge on the 4th floor to shop souvenirs if you wish. Have you visited these yet? What are your thoughts? Let me know in the comments and on social media.- T.S.

 

 

art christmas History Travel

Vizcaya Museum and Gardens

Vizcaya Museum and Gardens

In my last post I wrote about my trip to Miami in December. During that trip I visited the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens. Before going there I had never heard of this museum. I had planned a few things to see in Miami before my vacation to Florida but the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens were not on the list. I discovered it when I was already in Florida and Googled what else there was to see in Miami. Vizcaya was one of those finds, and luckily without me realizing it, the hotel I chose was right down the road!

 

If you stay in a hotel, check the front desk for a $2.00 coupon off the entrance for Vizcaya. We happened to visit Vizcaya the morning we checked out of the hotel, and I that is when I saw the coupon! Meant to be? I think so. (Click pictures to enlarge)

 

History of Vizcaya- I wrote a bit about it here as well, but here are some basic facts on the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens.

  • The Deering family business was International Harvester, the leading manufacturer of agricultural machinery in the U.S.A in the 1900’s.

 

  • 1908-1912- Business man William Deering, father of James Deering, moves his family from  Chicago due to his declining health. They relocate to Coconut Grove, Miami.

 

  • 1914 – James Deering chooses Biscayne Bay to build his own home. Construction on the main house and village of Vizcaya begins.

 

  • 1918- Columbian/Italian, Landscape Architect, Diego Suarez begins garden planning.

 

  • 1921- Gardens complete.

 

  • 1923- James Deering passes, Vizcaya is inherited by his brother Charles.

 

  • 1927- Charles Deering passess, his daughters and family inherit Vizcaya.

 

  • 1950’s- Vizcaya is openned to the public seasonally. A category five hurrican hits Miami on Labor Day and haults Vizcaya from becoming a museum.

 

  • 1960’s Deering family members gives Vizcaya land and village to Dade County to turn it into a museum. They also give land to Catholic charities, that use it to build a hospital and a school.

 

  • 1980’s- The Pope and President Reagan visit Vizcaya.

 

  • 1991- Queen Elizabeth II visits.

 

  • 1994-Vizcaya becomes a national landmark.

 

  • 2016- Vizcaya celebrates its centennial anniversary.

 

  • The Main house includes 54 rooms, of which 34 are open to visitors. There is also the Vizcaya Village that was originally used by staff to do agricultural work, make use of workshops, work fields, tend to green houses and much more. It is currently being renovated to be opened for the public.

 

Inside the Main House of Vizcaya

The interior rooms consists of the first floor which holds a courtyard with reception rooms, library, music room and a dining room. While the second floor includes Deering’s personal rooms, guest bedrooms, breakfast room and one of the kitchens. The interior rooms were designed inspired by Italian artifacts and were installed with the modern amenities of the time period. Including a telephone, laundry room, refrigerators and other items that had not made it into everyone’s home yet.

 

Artwork inside Vizcaya

The house holds many artworks and masterpieces, mainly acquired directly from James Deering. Although some were received in the 1980’s, with the arrival of the Claire Mendal Collection. The Claire Mendel collection of artworks was acquired by Mendal in Europe in the 1950’s, after the end of WWII.

After WWII the art world came up with guidelines on how museums should research and present information on Nazi-era art to the public, to ensure they are presented accurately. Along with following these guidelines, The Vizcaya Museum has made it a mission to research and return the Claire Medal Collection to their rightful homes.

They have been able to return 1 piece of artwork to the National Museum in Warsaw. Research is still being done on the 33 other works of art in their possession, that were originally stolen by the Nazi’s.

The Gardens and property surrounding the Main House

The gardens and house have had some restorations to preserve the property from salt water erosion and natural weather occurrences like hurricanes. While some additions were also made, like the skylight covering the courtyard and café and shop for visitors.

Vizcaya can be used for event photography and they also host interactive events for the public. I absolutely love it and plan to go back, hopefully more then once. I highly recommend that you do as well. Let me know your thoughts in the comments and on social media. Have you been to the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens? Is it on your bucket list now?-T.S.

 

 

 

 

christmas Travel

A December trip to Miami

A December trip to Miami

During December I visited my family in Florida for the holidays. I’ve done this before, but had never been to Miami in any of the years that I’ve gone to Florida. So I made it a point to plan a mini trip to Miami while there. On my list of things I wanted to see? The Wynwood Walls, La Placita, and the beach. The extra spots that we visited while there were a bonus. Here’s everything that we saw, did and some of what we ate. And boy did we EAT! Here is a December trip to a Miami.

The Drive To Miami

Because my family lives in Tampa, and is where we stay when visiting them, I knew we would need a car not only to see things own our own in town, but for the long road trip to Miami. From my family members house to the Wynwood Walls, our first stop in Miami, it took around 3 hours and 54 mins. That was the shortest way and required a toll to be paid. A large portion of the drive required crossing from the west of Florida to the east via route 75, or what the locals call, “alligator alley”.

This is supposedly because alligators like to come onto the swamp level highway and sun bathe. We did not see any alligators going or returning, but its good to know. You know you are getting closer to Miami thanks to the traffic congestion. Which reminded us of when trying to drive in and out of NYC.

 

Wynwood Walls

The very first thing we did when getting to Miami was drive to the Wynwood Walls. The famous art plastered walls grouped in Midtown Miami, near the Art District. Artwork and graffiti is immediately seen when you enter Miami, but this “urban graffiti art museum” was intentionally created to bring life back to the community.

In the early 2000’s it consisted of abandoned warehouses and was known as a crime hotspot. When Joey and Tony Goldman of Golden Properties discovered the abandoned property they took it on. Wynwood Walls was officially opened in 2009 with six warehouses serving as canvases for street art. Over the last 10 years it has hosted art from over 100 artists from over 20 countries. In total the artwork covers 85,000sq ft of walls.

I knew I would love this place, not only because I had been drooling over it on Instagram, but because of my appreciation for all things art. And if you appreciate the graffiti and art that covers walls in NYC, you’ll appreciate this too. I will say it was CROWDED, it is a tourist attraction after all. So pack your patience.

The streets and sidewalks outside the walls are also covered in artwork, so there is more to see than the walls themselves. The shops and restaurants outside the walls are ADORABLE, so we enjoyed walking around the city a bit as well. Tip: The streets get crowded and parking is hard to find, so we opted for a parking lot, probably your best option as well.

 

La Placita

After dropping our bags off at our room for the night our next stop was “La Placita“. This Puerto Rican restaurant was also a spot that I had been insta-stalking for a while. This restaurant was inspired by a market plaza in Santurce, Puerto Rico and was started by Chef Jose Mendin and actor Julian Gil. It serves typical Puerto Rican cuisine that I stuffed myself with.

The décor of the restaurant is full of Puerto Rican staples like Pilon’s engraved with names of famous visitors, Vejigante masks and Taino symbols. And of course, the flag, which wraps the exterior and can be found inside as well. They also have domino tables for people to play. Also not to be missed is a yummy sounding Brunch menu on the weekends. Next time I go, I’ll be sure to make it for brunch.

 

 

South Beach

After all the eating we did, walking was needed! And why not do that at the beach? So naturally a trip to South Beach was next. From the restaurant to South Beach it was about a 30 min drive. The buildings in South Beach are a mix of modern and original art deco architecture which gives you an idea on what Miami used to look like.

The beach was CLEAN! Sure it was not exactly the season for visitors, but there were small groups on the beach and the overall beach was cleanly. I loved the colorful lifeguard houses and the broadwalk. The boardwalk was a simple walk amoungts trees in between the beach and hotels. That day was rainy, so we got a bit soaked walking the boardwalk, but it was an experience that I enjoyed just the same.

Vizcaya Musuem and Gardens

The agenda for the next day was to visit the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens and Calle Ocho. Vizcaya Museum and Gardens was originally  the winter estate for Chicago business man, James Deering. In its prime it was 180 acres and consisted of the main house, gardens, buildings in South Miami for staff, machine shops and farm necessities. Currently the estate consists of 50 acres. It was created by James Deering, F. Burrall Hoffman, Diego Suarez and Paul Chalfin who served as the designer, garden planner and artistic director.

They took architectural influence from Italy and other parts of Europe and built it by 1916, taking only two years to complete the main house. The gardens were completed in 1922 and were intentionally built on the Biscayne Bay in between a mangrove shore and forest. In doing so and preserving the estates surroundings Deering became known as one of the first environmentalist in Miami. In 1952 it became a museum and is now considered a national historic landmark.

 

This is a BEAUTIFUL place and it really is so relaxing. Its as if your stepping into a peaceful time of European history. We walked the entire main house and surrounding gardens in around 3 hours. Statutes, plants, trees, fountains and diffrent passageways are found everywhere you walk amongst the gardens. While inside includes 54 rooms, of which 34 are open to the public. This is a must if you like musuems and history, when visiting Miami. I may go more in depth on this part of the trip later on.

 

Calle Ocho and Mofongo

Walking the grounds of the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens made us hungry, so the next stop for us was the Puerto Rican restaurant, Mofongo, on famous Calle Ocho. The restaurants décor and food made us feel at home, just like La Placita did. Everything was delisous!

 

A walk up and down Calle Ocho was the last thing we did before leaving town. The street was vibrant with murals of Latin icons, live music pouring out of restaurants, statues to Cuban revolutionaries and Domino park. While there don’t be surprised if you hear roosters. They walk the streets freely and are protected by the city. Something that reminded me a lot of Puerto Rico.

 

By the end of the trip I understood people’s fascination of Miami. I felt right at home hearing Spanish spoken just as much or more than English throughout the city and I loved it. I felt at home with the music and environment and fell in love with the art of Wynwood and beauty of Vizcaya. More trips to the city of Miami are definitely on my to-do list.

Have you ever been to Miami? Let me know in the comments or on social media. And make sure you’re following me on Instagram to catch more pictures of Miami.-T.S.

 

 

New York Travel

Visiting Governors Island

Visiting Governors Island

Last weekend I visited Governors Island, I had never been, not even for the seasonal events that get media coverage there. I recently saw a tv program that was talking about how renovated it was, which peaked my interested immediately. NYC in its ever renovating state will always have something new to see and this one was no different. If you’ve never been, whether tourists or local this is a must see. Trust me, its not a complete tourist trap this time of the year, it was actually very relaxing! Here is how I spent my day there and my tips for your own excursion to Governors Island.

 

What is Governors Island?

It’s exactly what it sounds like, an island off the concrete island of Manhattan where Govenors lived. Originally settled by the Dutch and named Nutten Island in 1624 it was renamed Governors Island in 1689 when it was home to the British royal governor. Throughout the late 1700’s until the 1990’s it served as a military base for the U.S. Army and Coastguard and is where Castle Williams was built as a military base and then a prison. The island also holds Fort Jay, which was built in the 1700’s and was used to defend New York from the British. Barracks and houses were also constructed as military personnel and their families lived on the island. By 2001 Governors Island was established as a national park under the care of New York City. No one lives there now as it is considered a national monument and is historically preserved.

 

Getting There

To get there you must take the Govenor’s Island Ferry from Wall Street Pier 11 to Soisson’s Landing on Governors Island. Ferries run pretty frequently, and on Saturdays and Sundays if you take any of the ferries before 12 pm its free! So that is exactly what we did. It was a short wait for the ferry and so was the ride to Govenors Island, approximately less than 10 mins. Enjoy the views as you take the quick trip back and forth.

 

Getting Around

Once there you’ll want to ask the info desk for a map. Govenors Island is a green island so the paper maps they give you have to be returned to them before you leave, or dropped in a basket in front of the info desk. We walked some of the way without it and we had to go back and ask for one as there weren’t that many maps around the park. Something we thought could be improved was the actual details of the maps, which were a bit lacking. But it’s a small Island and we walked the whole thing in one day, some parts more than once.

We decided to get our steps in as we walked the whole island, but they do have alternatives. Renting bikes from Blazing Saddles and Citi bike are available, as well as balance bikes for parents with small kids and surreys, a four wheeled cart for groups who want to ride around together. There were also pedal-carts and scooters for kids for rent as well. Every now and then as we rested we wished we rented one of the group bikes, although on the other hand every time bikers wanted to enter a histrorically preserved section of the island, like Castle Williams they would have to get off their bikes or surreys and walk.

 

Food

There are plenty of food options on Govenors Island, starting with the two restaraunts you see when you get to the island. Which are Taco Vista and Island Oyster which serves seafood and is where we stopped and ate dinner before we went back to Manhattan. The food was delish and the drink was spectacular. Watching the sun come down against the NYC sykline was an extra treat. During the day we ate lunch at Little Eva’s, one of the food trucks parked near Liggett Terrace and Hammock Grove. This location is where all the food trucks park for the day, so go around and weigh your options. The food at Little Eva’s was scrumptious as well. Overall we were very satisfied with the food options they had on the island.

Things To Do

As you walk the island be sure to stop and see all the historically preserved spots like Castle Williams and Fort Jay. Artwork is also present on the island with scupltures and plays and exhibitions held in a converted church as well as various houses that belonged to mitlitary families and Governors in the past. You can also bring a picnic if you wish as there is a designated picnic area or you can lounge on the various lawns in red chairs spread throughout the whole island.

 

The Urban Farm is a must see as people are welcomed to walk amoungst the growing vegatables and fruits. The staff were very friendly and informative as they told us what each plot was growing and invited us to touch and smell the bounty of nutritional goodness. Composting is also done and it is welcomed if you have something to contribute. The Urban Farm is not quite done being developed as there was still a section that was under construction.

Ziplinning, mini gulfing and rock climbing are also activities you can do on Govenors Island. Take the kids to Slide Hill, which holds the the longest slide in nyc, and make sure to check out the LMCC Art Center which holds diffrent art and sculpture exhibitions. Kayaking and staying overnight in a tent in the Collective Retreats are a few other things you can do. This is not even the whole list of activities! Not to mention the other seasonal activities they have up to the closing day of Governors Island of October 31st.

 

Views for a Lifetime of the City

The views of NYC from Governors Island are gorgeous and they follow you around as you make your way through the island. Make sure to take in the views at the top of The Hills  and on the Play Lawn. I walked to the top of The Hills and got gorgeous shots of lower Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty. If you walk the perimeter of the island you will also get great shots of the city as well.

We plan to go back once Governors Island opens again to the public on May 1st. If you plan to visit Governors Island before the closing day of October 31st this year it will be good to know that the island is open Monday-Fridays 10am-6pm and Saturdays and Sundays from 10am to 7pm. Let me know if you plan to visit or if you’ve ever been to Governors Island-T.S.

 

 

Travel

Stay-cation in Atlantic City

Stay-cation in Atlantic City

Last week we went on a stay-cation to Atlantic City with family friends. I had never been to the seaside city known for gambling and entertainment shows. The city itself is run down except for a few up-kept historical spots, a shopping strip and of course the casino/hotels. The boardwalk was a tale of the same, one side vibrant with stores, The Hard Rock Cafe and a pier with rides, games and restaurants. While the other side had not as many, thanks to some businesses closed down and past attractions taken away. One would think that in a city that generates money from gambling there would be more upkeep to so such a large attraction and to the city itself. Although we don’t have to think that hard on where all that money stays (casinos). If only those casinos would invest in the city itself?

 

We did get to see a few historical places that I found interesting. There is a time capsule buried in front of a church that is to be opened in 2056 that we stopped to see. Although the most interesting place, was the Abescon Lighthouse with an attached house that serves as a museum. Not only did I enjoy this place because of all the history it held but because of the lighthouse keeper, named Buddy. The museum is free but if you pay a fee you can walk up to the top of the lighthouse where the lighthouse keeper, Buddy waits to greet you and tell you more about the site. Buddy is 92 years old! He is there every Friday, although the other employees say he’s there up to three times a week. He served in WWII and traveled with his now deceased wife when they were young.

 

Buddy who is quite chatty, told me of one particular trip to South America with his wife and how they forewent wanting kids in favor of traveling. My kind of couple! He became interested in becoming a lighthouse keeper after doing the New Jersey Lighthouse Challenge with a few friends. Buddy thoroughly enjoys volunteering there, celebrating his birthdays with the lighthouse staff and has been the lighthouse keeper for what will be 10 years in October. He walks up and down the 228 steps of the lighthouse just like everyone else. Once again Buddy is 92 YEARS OLD!  He attributes good genes, and physical activities like the Tai Chi classes he takes to his longevity. Buddy was one of the highlights of the trip for me. If you go to Atlantic City you have to visit Buddy at the top of the Abescon lighthouse!

Facts about the lighthouse:

Jan 15, 1857 was when the lighthouse began shining across the Atlantic. The light beamed 20 miles out to sea.

The position of the current museum is exactly where the original light house keeper lived and it was known as the “Keeper’s Dwelling”.

The assistant keepers dwelling or the assistant lighthouse keeper also had a house, located behind the lighthouse.

By July 11, 1933 the lighthouse was decommissioned or put out of service thanks to the rising skyline of Atlantic City.

Lighthouse keepers had strict rules to follow, like that of a person in the military. They were to stay in the watchroom and never leave unless an assistant keeper or trusted person came and took their place. While other requirements included being neat, sober and managing the upkeep of the lighthouse and the grounds.

 

 

The rest of my trip included eating really good Peruvian food at El Chalan on 2641 Artic Ave. Playing Rummikub, which I’m finally getting the hang of thanks to my Rummikub tutor (my mom’s friends), walking the boardwalk at night, riding a ride at the amusement park with my moms thrill loving friend and pushing a single slot machine button. And no, we didn’t win anything! Lastly, a few hours at the beach was spent before heading home.

 

 

 

If you’re interested in visiting Atlantic City in November, Puerto Rican Salsa Group El Gran Combo will be at the Tropicana on November 30th. Make sure to pickup the Atlantic County Coupon Guide in your hotel or at the Absecon Lighthouse for a discount off the admission to the lighthouse and to other events in A.C. Have you ever been to Atlantic City, what was your experience? Let me know in the comments and on social media.-T.S.

Lifestyle New York Travel

Top 4 cars I loved at the New York International Auto Show

NY Autoshow

The New York  International Auto Show is always a fun event to attend. This is my third time going thanks to A Girls Guide to Cars who hosts Girls Night Out. These events are always filled with educational information not only on cars but on how the bloggers and social media influencers that attend this night can improve their business and platforms. Among the guests, speakers were the co-creator of the first electric adventure vehicles, Rivian, and representatives of Purewow, the digital lifestyle platform. As attendees went around to each brand were learned about the cars and how to use apps and social media to improve our blogs and social media platforms. Although I don’t know much about cars, I admire the work and details that go into making them. This year I stopped by Nissan to admire the GTR line up, more than once. Nerd Alert: I don’t know much, but I do remember the GTR being Brian’s car in the Fast and the Furious franchise. Here are the other cars I loved in the auto show. This post is sponsored by A Girls Guide to Cars.

 

Rivian

Rivian makes the worlds first electric adventure vehicles. Inspired by the great outdoors the brand currently has the  R1S All-Electric SUV and the R1T All-Electric Truck. The truck includes three outlets, a compressed air nozzle to fill up tires, a rear bin with a full-sized spare tire and a gear tunnel for extra storage among other amenities. Rivian is an all American made car company located in California, with its original inception in Normal, Illinois.

 

 

 

Jaguar

Jaguar unveiled its newest all-electric car, the I-Pace. Some specifications include storage in the front where the motor would be and retractable handles that retract when the car is locked and in motion. The Jaguar I-Pace has been awarded World Car of the Year, World Green Car of the Year and World Car Design of the Year, all for 2019. Details include 234 miles with a fully charged battery, the ability to go from 0-60 in 4.5 seconds, compact style and the ability to charge up to 80% in under two hours.

 

 

Toyota

Toyota showcased its Highland Hybrid and newest Prius Prime. The Highland Hybrid includes an electric motor, all wheel drive and the ability to be equipped to tow up to 3500 pounds. The inside perks include a Blue Ray player, remote and headphones, a moonroof, silencing insulation for a quiet interior, seating up to 8 and more. Perfect for your whole family to fit in comfortably and enjoy the ride. On display was the FV2 concept car, their future mobility concept that would have driving or a riding mode, and which will be able to connect to a person’s emotions by relying on facial and body movements. The car would also be able to move in the direction the driver wants by simple voice and facial commands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nissan GTR

Nissan showcased its line up of GTR’s including the 50th Annivvery GTR 50 by Italdesign prototype.  This newest edition will only include the production of no more than 50 vehicles and will cost  999,000 euros. Its interior includes black Italian leather and gold accents. Also on display were the original 370z and 50th Anniversary 370z.

 

 

I also enjoyed the classic car collection that included a 1976 Ferrari, 1961 Maserati, 1966 Lamborghini and more. Stay tuned to my Instagram as I post pictures of cars not shown here. Have you gone to the New York International Auto Show? What are your favorite cars to see while there?-T.S.

Spanish /Espanol Travel

Visitando la ciudad de Nueva York

nyc

Se que tengo seguidores y suscriptores que le encantan visitar a Nueva York. Y otros que lo estan planeando. Manhattan y la ciudad de Neuva York, que incluye Queens, Bronx, Brooklyn y Staten Island tienen un sin numero de cosas que ver y hacer.  Asi que, aqui esta una lista de cosas que necesitas saber quando visitas a Nueva York y la isla de concreto. Tambien puedes descargar un “freebie” que cree’ si eres suscriptor de mi blog. Este entrada tiene enlaces de afiliacion.

 

Transportacion

Caminar-La cuidad de Nueva York es una ciudad de caminar. PERO para turistas que no estan acostumbrados a caminar mucho el subway es el mejor opcion. Los calles son largos, cruzando cinco calles te puede cojer 20-30 minutos o mas si no caminas rapido. Mientras tu caminas vas a ver los Neoyorquinos pasando te con prisa, porque sabemos si queremos llegar a la subway, tren o necesitamos estar en algun lugar en tiempo, necesitamos cruzar los calles largisimos.

 

Subway-La forma de transportacion mas rapida es el “subway”. Tambien es la forma mas economico de andar.  Ala misma vez la mayoria de los subways son viejos y se pueden tardan. Asegurate  de comprar un ¨Metro Card¨ la forma de pagar en el subway. Dependiendo de cauntas personas usuen el ¨metro card¨ pon la cantidad que crees que necesitaras. Ahora mismo un viaje por subway cuesta $2.62-$2.75 por persona.

 

Taxi, Lyft, Uber- Descargar los apps Lyft y Uber para pedir un caro, y mas caro pero mas rapido de ver son los Taxi´s amarriollo´s.

 

 

Cosas que ver y hacer

Top of the Rock y Rockefeller Center

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Botanical Garden- Gardin Botanica

9-ll Memorial

Statue of Liberty

Highline

The Metropolitan Museum of Art la de la quinta avenida, que tiene una mezcla de diferentes tipos de arte. El Met Bruer para arte moderna y The Cloisters para arte clasica y que se encuntra dentro de un parque.

The Museum of FIT- Museuo de Moda

Natural Hitsory Museum- Museo de naturaleza y animales, muy frecuentado por familias que tienen ninos.

Central Park  y el Central Park Zoo- El parque mas grande de Nueva York que tambien tiene un zoologico ademas de otras activitades.

Times Square… y mucho mas.

 

 

Ropa

La ciudad de Nueva York es el capital de Moda en los Estados Unidos. La cosa que mas indetifica los turistas como turistas ademas de estar perdidos fisicamente es el vestimento. Si, es posible estar comodo y estar en tendencia con lo que esta de moda! Si tienes dudas en que ponerte, los colores negro y blanco siempre van con todo! Inspirarte de los New Yorquinos y ponte majones, jacketas estilo moto o jean y un t-shirt. Los siguiente son otro ejemplos en que ponerte.

Botas

 

Joggers

Tenis

 

 

Ballerinas

 

Accesorios

 

 

 

Jackets estilo Moto

 

Costumbres de la mayoria de la gente en NYC

Caminamos RAPIDO y no paramos para la senal de cruzar.

Adamos con los audifonos puesto quando caminamos.

 

 

Si vistitas la cuidad in Febrero o Septiembre

Estos meses son reconocidas como Fashion Week Months o los Meses de la Moda, en que ocurren la semenas de Moda. Durante este tiempo habra gente de el mundo de la moda como disenadores, modelos, reporteros, fotografos y bloggers andando como locos por todo la ciudad. Vas a ver moda impecable que amaras y moda que pensaras que los que lo tienen puesto estan loco. Pero es Nueva York, la ciudad de la moda, y por muchos, no la ciudad de decir ´¨no, esto se ve loco¨, no importa si se ver realmente loco.

 

La cosa mas importante es disfrutar de una de las ciudades mas bello del mundo asegurandote que te mentengas alerta de tus alrededores. Se que estoy olvidando me de cosas importantes, pero espero que este ¨post¨ te ayuda. Si tienes preguntas, ponlos en los ¨comments¨o  por mi redes sociales.-T.S.

 

 

christmas Lifestyle The Metropolitan Museum of Art Travel

Must See’s and Things to Do During Christmas in NYC

Must See's During Christmas in NYC

Lets not kid ourselves NYC will always be a Christmas/December destination. There are already so many tourists that visit NYC during the rest of the year, and not surprisingly that number jumps during the holidays. Although it is worth it to see the beautifully decorated stores, attractions and experience a New York City Christmas. Here’s a list of things to do and places to see this holiday season in NYC. (Locals pack your patience, visit early or at the end of the season, or avoid midtown like the plague!)

 

Uptown

  • Central Park Ice Skating at Wollman Rink– I haven’t done this yet but it is said to be less crowded than Rockefeller Center with a gorgeous view of the surrounding park. It’s on my to-do list.

 

 

 

  • The Nutcrakcer Ballet at Lincoln Center- This is also on my to-do list! If you’re into ballet, why not see a top ballet company preform a Christmas classic.

 

  • Metropolitan Museum of Art : Medieval Hall- I love visiting this part of the museum especially during Christmas. A tree is put up surrounded by a manger, angels and medieval decorations. On display until January.

 

Midtown

  • Rockefeller Center-This is a must for tourists! It is really a sight to see that gigantic tree lit up. Ice skating here will be crowded if you go mid December and the more people on the ice the more choppy it is.  I did this once with family members from out-of-town at the end of the season and it was not crowded but the ice was extremely rough. Its beautiful, but the rough ice and crowds should be something to consider.

 

  • The Christmas Spectacular and The Rockettes– I also suggest seeing the Rockettes perform, it is a great show and a classic. The last time I saw it I enjoyed the new segments added, particularly the homage to the city of New York.

 

  • The Winter Village at Bryant Park/ New York Public Library on 5th- These should be seen together, I suggest visiting the shops at Bryant Park and entering the library after. The front entrance is decorated and has a beautifully decorated Christmas Tree.

 

  • Store Windows on 5th Ave -After you’ve seen Bryant Park and the library walk out onto Fifth  Ave and walk north towards all the holiday windows. Don’t miss Saks, Bergdorf Goodman and Tiffany & Co. Not on 5th but must see’s are Macy’s windows on 34th which has Santa Land inside. Bloomingdale’s also has gorgeous holiday windows on 1000 third ave and 59th st.

 

  • Grand Central Holiday Fair Market – Stay warm in this indoor holiday market located in Grand Central Station. I like to grab something to eat from the adjacent food vendors.

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Downtown

  • Wall Street Christmas Tree- Visit the Christmas tree on Wall Street. The surrounding buildings are decorated and are lit up at night. Don’t forget to pass Trinity Church which is also decorated and Zuccotti Park which has small Christmas trees that are lit in the evening.

 

  • Flat Iron District-Visit the tree at Madison Square Park. A tree lighting ceremony will take place Dec 6th from 3:30-5:30pm.

 

  • Ice Skate at the Standard The hotel in the Meatpacking district opens its skating rink to guests and the general public from December 20th to the end of March.

 

  • Union Square Holiday Market-Visit the market which runs until December 24th. Buy from local vendors and eateries, visit the kids art studio and heat up in the warming station and lounge.

 

Other Boroughs

  • Holiday Train Show– The New York Botanical Garden host the Holiday Train Show. It showcases miniature New York City landmarks all made of natural materials.

 

  • Vintage Subway Museum– Open year round, explore what subway cars used to look like in the main branch of the museum in downtown Brooklyn. If you plan to stay in Manhattan, visit the smaller museum at the Grand Central Gallery Annex and Store.

 

  • Astoria Holiday Market– A Holiday market in Astoria Queens that sells vintage goods and food. Open December 9th and 16th at the Bohemian Hall.

 

  • Winter Fest at the Brooklyn Museum– The Brooklyn Botanical Garden teams up with the Brooklyn Museum to create an indoor winter wonderland. Activities include live performances, food, a tree maze, Santaland and an array of activates for the whole family.

 

  • Dyker Heights Lights- Houses in Brooklyn are decorated with spectacular light shows. Great Christmas Light Fight anyone? Located on Dyker Heights Blvd from 83rd st-86th.

 

There are so many more things to do! Did I miss a must for you? Are you planning to visit NYC this Christmas season? Let me know in the comments an on social media!-T.S.

 

Travel

Renovated and Revived: South Street Seaport

south street seaport

If you follow my stories on Instagram you’ll know that last week I got to check out the newly open Pier 17 at South-Street Seaport. It’s been five years since it closed for renovations in 2013 after being hit by hurricane Sandy. Its been newly renovated with locals in mind as opposed to being a full on tourists spot. It was a day of taking my mom around to do touristy things like go to a museum that I never went to before, even though I use to walk by it everyday! Because lets face it, when you become so used to living or working in an iconic city, you forget and don’t realize how many historical attractions there are right in your backyard. That is something tourists and visitors don’t get wrong, visiting the historical and iconic spots. (Click pics to enlarge)

 

We finished our museum visits in the financial district and headed to South Street Seaport. If you are a tourists or potential tourists to this area, please don’t waste your money taking the subway or a taxi from the financial district to south street seaport. This is very walkable even at a leisurely pace and the blocks are a bit shorter, so enjoy the walk among the cobble stone streets and original architecture!

South Street Seaport and Pier 17 are not completely finished yet and some of the areas are still blocked off to the public as they continue renovations. Although what I saw was beautifully well done and has already done the area justice. I remember only a little bit about what it used to look like since I had not visited this area since I was little. I’ve worked in the financial district since, but like I mentioned before since its always there, I had not thought to go see what it looked like now. I don’t feel that bad though since it was under construction until its unveiling on June 30th 2018.

 

The pier itself has brand new boardwalk planks and the building is a airy with  glass windows that wraps around the building. While wood and glass continue running inside and follow outside to the back patio. Currently open are only the ground floor and the rooftop while the second floor shops are still under construction. The first floor holds the summer pop up, Market Hall restaurant and runs straight  into the back patio. Market Hall, which we ate at has a minimal menu curated by Chef David Kornell while the space itself has a nautical vibe. It was all delicious, the drinks which you can have in an alcoholic form as well were really refreshing and unlike any other drink I’ve ever had.

 

 

 

The back patio or River Lounge has rocker swings, lounge seats and the game cornhole for adults and kids alike to play. While a walk around will lead you to the Chase Sapphire Bar which held a ballon art installation by Geronimo and high seats to sit and watch the water. And the most impressive of it all, that Brooklyn Bridge and downtown Manhattan view. Also on the first floor is a Ticketmaster booth to  concert tickets for the south street seaport concert series. When you head up, unfortunately the middle floors are not finished, but you can head to the rooftop.

 

The rooftop holds stage space for concerts, intimate party space and spots to sit and take in the views. Once again the views are even more iconic as you get an above ground view of Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn and the Manhattan Bridge. The completed rooftop will include a restaurant, outdoor bars and will span 1.5 acres. I’m looking forward to seeing what it looks like when every section of South Street Seaport is open.

 

 

 

South Street Seaport Facts:

  • South Street Seaport is NY’s original commercial section

 

  • It was created in the 17th century and helped make NYC an economic powerhouse with the Dutch West India Company outpost that traded with old and new worlds

 

  • By the 1860’s the seaport was open 24/7,  making the Seaport District the first neighborhood that was open 24/7 in NYC. Dubbing NYC  “The city the never sleeps”.

 

  • By 1970’s the Seaport District created the urban renewal concept which preserved historical buildings while allowing developing real estate around them.

 

  • Once completely renovated the district will include 400,000 square feet of fashion, culinary, entertainment and cultural activities.

 

  • Restaurants by Andrew Carmellini, David Chong,Helene Henderson of the Momofuku Group and Jean- Georges Vongerichten are expected to open.

 

  • The experimental store 10 Corso Como by Carla Sozzani is  also expected to open

 

  • A 50,000 sq ft food hall by Jean -Georges  will open in the Tin Building

 

  • Pier 17 is ESPN’s new live broadcast studio

 

 

 

Steps away from Pier 17 the historic Fulton Street shops are also reopening. Some already open are the candy store It’s Sugar and the IPic theather, the Fulton Stall Market (Farmers Market) and much more. While new stores like the Sarah Jessica Parker (SJP) boutique are yet to open.

 

Hidden on the basement level of Pier 17 is Level 4 an event space with views of the Brooklyn Bridge, DUMBO, and the Statue of Liberty. Its purpose will be to be rented out and used as a venue for events.  Also rentable are the rooftop, Seaport Square at the entrance of Pier 17, and the Historic District :Beekman St.-John St. and South St. – Water St.

 

Make sure to check out my NYC highlight on Instagram to see more on the newly open South Street Seaport. Have you checked it out yet? Let me know in the comments and on social media. Learn more here.

T.S.