Browsing Tag

travel

Fashion exhibit The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Met’s Camp:Notes on Fashion

camp

The aesthetic of “Camp” comes from the French “Se Camper” or “to flaunt”. The first use of the word and aesthetic was introduced 1671 during the play ” The Impostures of Scapin”. In this comedy a servant it told to “camp it up” and ‘strut around like a drama queen”. “Se camper” not only alludes to being overly dramatic or extravagant but also to a pose that derives from  a man standing with his hand on his hip. This type of pose originally represented power and relaxation, until the Renaissance where it also became associated with homosexuality. Through the 1700 the word camp became used in the crossdressing community, mainly as a code word of a sort to describe noblemen who dressed as women, and later on in the 1800’s -1900’s to describe men in England who became famous for dressing as women. Although arrested or worse, many men who were “camp” did go out in public dressed as women. Two in particular Fredrik Park and Ernest Boulton created a small touring theatrical company  in the1800’s and played the characters Franny and Stella. Click on picture to enlarge.

Author Oscar Wilde was also connected to the camp community. This affiliation was used against him when he tried to file a lawsuit against the father of his lover, Lord Alfred . Throughout his life his relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas is well documented and so were his instructions to actors in his plays to wear symbolisms of camp culture. Both were used as evidence in the trial against him for “gross indecency” in the 1800’s. He was sentence to two years of hard labor in prison. The popularity of the trial and his sentence made Wilde a martyr and cemented the overlapping of camp culture with homosexuality.

 

Isherwoodian Camp:

In 1954 author Christopher Isherwood wrote “The World in the Evening”. Which basaclly broke down camp into high camp and low camp. High camp being one of a man who partakes in sophisticated activites and low camp being a boy in a feather boa. To him high camp was seriousness, expressed in fun, artifice and elegance.

camp

Jean Paul Gaultier

 

Sontagian Camp:

In the Fall of 1964 Susan Sontag wrote “Notes on Camp” in the Partisan Review. She was the first to approach camp and study it as a subject in society that leveled the playing field and offered indifference between high art, pop culture and cultural hierarchies. Her notes pushed camp into mainstream society. In her notes on camp she mentions the following items, which could all be found at the Met.

 

She also wrote the differences on naïve camp and delibrate camp, which in part agrees with Isherwoodian camp. Naïve camp is being unintentional while deliberate camp is being calculated and manufacturesd. The fashion showed in this section are examples of niave and delibrate camp next to one another.

 

 

Camp Eye: During this part of the exhibition, camp is featured in a louder and bolder light as it became more acceptable in society. The fashion showcased here are categorized under 18 statements that talk about key aspects of camp, or what camp means to the designers showcased. I won’t list all the statements, but I found this one by Susan Sontang to be the most direct. “Camp is not a natural mode of sensibility, if there be any such. Indeed the essence of Camp is its love of the unnatural: of artifice and exaggeration.”

 

 

 

Because of its ability to shock, Camp makes its way into times of divide whether in society or politics. Camp is different things to different people, whether they identify it as gay, a way to be extravagant or a way to showcase what’s happening around them. Camp: Notes on Fashion is open until September 8th at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.-T.S.

 

Lifestyle New York Travel

Top 4 cars I loved at the New York International Auto Show

NY Autoshow

The New York  International Auto Show is always a fun event to attend. This is my third time going thanks to A Girls Guide to Cars who hosts Girls Night Out. These events are always filled with educational information not only on cars but on how the bloggers and social media influencers that attend this night can improve their business and platforms. Among the guests, speakers were the co-creator of the first electric adventure vehicles, Rivian, and representatives of Purewow, the digital lifestyle platform. As attendees went around to each brand were learned about the cars and how to use apps and social media to improve our blogs and social media platforms. Although I don’t know much about cars, I admire the work and details that go into making them. This year I stopped by Nissan to admire the GTR line up, more than once. Nerd Alert: I don’t know much, but I do remember the GTR being Brian’s car in the Fast and the Furious franchise. Here are the other cars I loved in the auto show. This post is sponsored by A Girls Guide to Cars.

 

Rivian

Rivian makes the worlds first electric adventure vehicles. Inspired by the great outdoors the brand currently has the  R1S All-Electric SUV and the R1T All-Electric Truck. The truck includes three outlets, a compressed air nozzle to fill up tires, a rear bin with a full-sized spare tire and a gear tunnel for extra storage among other amenities. Rivian is an all American made car company located in California, with its original inception in Normal, Illinois.

 

 

 

Jaguar

Jaguar unveiled its newest all-electric car, the I-Pace. Some specifications include storage in the front where the motor would be and retractable handles that retract when the car is locked and in motion. The Jaguar I-Pace has been awarded World Car of the Year, World Green Car of the Year and World Car Design of the Year, all for 2019. Details include 234 miles with a fully charged battery, the ability to go from 0-60 in 4.5 seconds, compact style and the ability to charge up to 80% in under two hours.

 

 

Toyota

Toyota showcased its Highland Hybrid and newest Prius Prime. The Highland Hybrid includes an electric motor, all wheel drive and the ability to be equipped to tow up to 3500 pounds. The inside perks include a Blue Ray player, remote and headphones, a moonroof, silencing insulation for a quiet interior, seating up to 8 and more. Perfect for your whole family to fit in comfortably and enjoy the ride. On display was the FV2 concept car, their future mobility concept that would have driving or a riding mode, and which will be able to connect to a person’s emotions by relying on facial and body movements. The car would also be able to move in the direction the driver wants by simple voice and facial commands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nissan GTR

Nissan showcased its line up of GTR’s including the 50th Annivvery GTR 50 by Italdesign prototype.  This newest edition will only include the production of no more than 50 vehicles and will cost  999,000 euros. Its interior includes black Italian leather and gold accents. Also on display were the original 370z and 50th Anniversary 370z.

 

 

I also enjoyed the classic car collection that included a 1976 Ferrari, 1961 Maserati, 1966 Lamborghini and more. Stay tuned to my Instagram as I post pictures of cars not shown here. Have you gone to the New York International Auto Show? What are your favorite cars to see while there?-T.S.

Spanish /Espanol Travel

Visitando la ciudad de Nueva York

nyc

Se que tengo seguidores y suscriptores que le encantan visitar a Nueva York. Y otros que lo estan planeando. Manhattan y la ciudad de Neuva York, que incluye Queens, Bronx, Brooklyn y Staten Island tienen un sin numero de cosas que ver y hacer.  Asi que, aqui esta una lista de cosas que necesitas saber quando visitas a Nueva York y la isla de concreto. Tambien puedes descargar un “freebie” que cree’ si eres suscriptor de mi blog. Este entrada tiene enlaces de afiliacion.

 

Transportacion

Caminar-La cuidad de Nueva York es una ciudad de caminar. PERO para turistas que no estan acostumbrados a caminar mucho el subway es el mejor opcion. Los calles son largos, cruzando cinco calles te puede cojer 20-30 minutos o mas si no caminas rapido. Mientras tu caminas vas a ver los Neoyorquinos pasando te con prisa, porque sabemos si queremos llegar a la subway, tren o necesitamos estar en algun lugar en tiempo, necesitamos cruzar los calles largisimos.

 

Subway-La forma de transportacion mas rapida es el “subway”. Tambien es la forma mas economico de andar.  Ala misma vez la mayoria de los subways son viejos y se pueden tardan. Asegurate  de comprar un ¨Metro Card¨ la forma de pagar en el subway. Dependiendo de cauntas personas usuen el ¨metro card¨ pon la cantidad que crees que necesitaras. Ahora mismo un viaje por subway cuesta $2.62-$2.75 por persona.

 

Taxi, Lyft, Uber- Descargar los apps Lyft y Uber para pedir un caro, y mas caro pero mas rapido de ver son los Taxi´s amarriollo´s.

 

 

Cosas que ver y hacer

Top of the Rock y Rockefeller Center

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Botanical Garden- Gardin Botanica

9-ll Memorial

Statue of Liberty

Highline

The Metropolitan Museum of Art la de la quinta avenida, que tiene una mezcla de diferentes tipos de arte. El Met Bruer para arte moderna y The Cloisters para arte clasica y que se encuntra dentro de un parque.

The Museum of FIT- Museuo de Moda

Natural Hitsory Museum- Museo de naturaleza y animales, muy frecuentado por familias que tienen ninos.

Central Park  y el Central Park Zoo- El parque mas grande de Nueva York que tambien tiene un zoologico ademas de otras activitades.

Times Square… y mucho mas.

 

 

Ropa

La ciudad de Nueva York es el capital de Moda en los Estados Unidos. La cosa que mas indetifica los turistas como turistas ademas de estar perdidos fisicamente es el vestimento. Si, es posible estar comodo y estar en tendencia con lo que esta de moda! Si tienes dudas en que ponerte, los colores negro y blanco siempre van con todo! Inspirarte de los New Yorquinos y ponte majones, jacketas estilo moto o jean y un t-shirt. Los siguiente son otro ejemplos en que ponerte.

Botas

 

Joggers

Tenis

 

 

Ballerinas

 

Accesorios

 

 

 

Jackets estilo Moto

 

Costumbres de la mayoria de la gente en NYC

Caminamos RAPIDO y no paramos para la senal de cruzar.

Adamos con los audifonos puesto quando caminamos.

 

 

Si vistitas la cuidad in Febrero o Septiembre

Estos meses son reconocidas como Fashion Week Months o los Meses de la Moda, en que ocurren la semenas de Moda. Durante este tiempo habra gente de el mundo de la moda como disenadores, modelos, reporteros, fotografos y bloggers andando como locos por todo la ciudad. Vas a ver moda impecable que amaras y moda que pensaras que los que lo tienen puesto estan loco. Pero es Nueva York, la ciudad de la moda, y por muchos, no la ciudad de decir ´¨no, esto se ve loco¨, no importa si se ver realmente loco.

 

La cosa mas importante es disfrutar de una de las ciudades mas bello del mundo asegurandote que te mentengas alerta de tus alrededores. Se que estoy olvidando me de cosas importantes, pero espero que este ¨post¨ te ayuda. Si tienes preguntas, ponlos en los ¨comments¨o  por mi redes sociales.-T.S.

 

 

Fashion exhibit The Museum at FIT

Fabric in Fashion Exhibition at the Museum of FIT

Fabric in Fashion

 

Do you know what fabric your clothes are made of? Ever wonder why a specific fabric was chosen to create a garment you own? I learned about this when I was in college along with other fabric specifications. That is why when I walked into the Fabric in Fashion exhibition at the Museum at FIT I felt like I was taking another course in college. Another reminder was the guide talking to a small group of students as she explained the different fabrics. If you have a loved one that sews, you’ll also know that fabric selection is important, even if its just for kitchen curtains. A project like that would need a fabric that can resist sun fading, could be easily cleaned and so on. The same goes for the creation of gowns, you want a fabric that will provide movement and work well with the natural form of the body.

 

All fabrics are not made the same, so it is important that a designer and your local seamstress choose the correct one. Being so, you can imagine that choosing the right fabrics can be a designer’s most important decision when creating entire collections. This precise decision making has been taking place since the 18th century when dressmakers would use specific fabrics and colors to symbolize status and hierarchy.  Here is the breakdown of fabrics and how and why they are used both in the past and present.

 

Cotton– Cotton originated in India and was used as a source of economic control by the British when they invaded the country during the 1700s. The production of cheaper cotton and the use of machinery led to the Industrial Revolution in 18th century Britain. And finally during the 19th-century, cotton became a huge source of income for the United States. Around a total of  $115 million dollars was earned in the cotton industry as a result of slavery in cotton fields. The properties of cotton made it a high commodity throughout centuries thanks to its ability to dye easily, breath on the body, take prints and retain colors even after many wash cycles.

 

 

Wool– Originating from Mesopotamia wool production crossed into the surrounding countries. Soon England began using it and by 1660 it became a major source of their trade. The colonization of Australia and New Zealand also lead to new sources of wool. This fiber has the ability to be flexible, relislant, and flame resistant. Not to mention the warmth it generates and its ability to be dyed.  It is also a source fabric in tailoring thanks to its reactions to heat and moisture which make it a moldable fabric. Pieces shown here are from the 1800’s -2018 from England, Italy, France, the USA and India.  Designers include Lilly Dache, Mila Schon, a red coat enseamble by Azzedine Alaia and Bomber jacket ensemble by Brodice Studio.

 

 

Synthetics– Synthetics are man-made fabrics produced by chemicals that create cellulose, a fiber that can be found in plants. During the 1930s American companies were the foreleaders in discovering synthetic fibers and the creation of synthetic fabric. In the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s synthetics were popular not only in fast fashion but in Haute Couture. This material was lower in cost to produce and introduced new fabrics to the market, many that imitate naturally produced fabrics like silk. Although highly resourceful, synthetics are not biodegradable and are a large component of the pollution problem that is part of the fashion industry.

 

Synthetic fabrics include Nylon, Rayon, Polyester, Spandex, Acrylic imitating wool and Acetate imitating silk. A big example of synthetics is the creation of sportswear garments, which use spandex, nylon and more thanks to its wicking abilities to let go of moisture. Examples shown here range from the 1930’s- 1970’s with pieces including the purple Courreges vinyl coat and pink Ultrasuede Halston dress. A mustard yellow and burgundy ensemble by Nigel Atkinson and Junichi Arai. And finally, an Issey Miyake ruffled cape ensemble and Jean Paul Gaultier nylon, acrylic and rayon suit.

 

 

 

Silk– Originating from China, this woven textile was a sign of wealth in the mid 18th century. It was also a predominate fabric in the creation of robes for clergy in the Catholic church. Western fashion not only took to this fabric originating in the East but was inspired by Chinese culture with prints and through the styling of silk fabrics. The garments shown here were created as far back as the 1700s to the present day.

 

 

 

Knits- A knit is a textile that is created from one yarn or set of yarns. Knitting via machinery was introduced in England in 1589. It is one of the most popular fabrics used thanks to its properties. It has the ability to stretch, conform to a body and it is also the fastest fabric to work with due to the fact that it is created with one single yarn. The ensembles shown here range from 1810 and 1920 Lelong, 1970 Missoni, 1980’s Azzedine Alaia, a yellow 1940’s Madame Gres for Alix dress, 1970’s Stephen Burrows ensemble, 2010 Ohne Titel muti-media dress and an orange 2015 Alexander Wang knit dress.

 

 

Couture Textiles– Before the mid-19th-century designers were not allowed to sell their own textiles, they were only allowed to use what a customer brought into them to work with. After the mid 19th century this rule was changed and designers began obtaining their own fabrics and creating their own designs. By the 20th century, designers moved on to incorporating fabrics from international sources and adding synthetics to their fabrics. Thus the birth of couture textiles, one of a kind fabrics, was introduced. Pieces in this section include House of Worth 1900, Boue Soeurs 1919, Nina Ricci 1935 cherry closure dress and cape, Bob Bugnand dress and mink trim coat. It also includes a silver and gold 1958 aluminum and plastic film fiber evening dress, 1962 Christian Dior yellow silk evening dress, 1862 Balenciaga evening cape and a 2011 Chado Ralph Rucci woven motif white coat.

 

 

Prints projected on a plain dress.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

This exhibition will be open at the Museum at FIT until May 4, 2019.

 

Now that you know a little bit more about fabrics I encourage you to pay attention to what you’re wearing. The use of these fabrics require diffrent methods of use and care, and are purposefully used by designers as such. So do you know what fabric you’re wearing?-T.S.

christmas Lifestyle The Metropolitan Museum of Art Travel

Must See’s and Things to Do During Christmas in NYC

Must See's During Christmas in NYC

Lets not kid ourselves NYC will always be a Christmas/December destination. There are already so many tourists that visit NYC during the rest of the year, and not surprisingly that number jumps during the holidays. Although it is worth it to see the beautifully decorated stores, attractions and experience a New York City Christmas. Here’s a list of things to do and places to see this holiday season in NYC. (Locals pack your patience, visit early or at the end of the season, or avoid midtown like the plague!)

 

Uptown

  • Central Park Ice Skating at Wollman Rink– I haven’t done this yet but it is said to be less crowded than Rockefeller Center with a gorgeous view of the surrounding park. It’s on my to-do list.

 

 

 

  • The Nutcrakcer Ballet at Lincoln Center- This is also on my to-do list! If you’re into ballet, why not see a top ballet company preform a Christmas classic.

 

  • Metropolitan Museum of Art : Medieval Hall- I love visiting this part of the museum especially during Christmas. A tree is put up surrounded by a manger, angels and medieval decorations. On display until January.

 

Midtown

  • Rockefeller Center-This is a must for tourists! It is really a sight to see that gigantic tree lit up. Ice skating here will be crowded if you go mid December and the more people on the ice the more choppy it is.  I did this once with family members from out-of-town at the end of the season and it was not crowded but the ice was extremely rough. Its beautiful, but the rough ice and crowds should be something to consider.

 

  • The Christmas Spectacular and The Rockettes– I also suggest seeing the Rockettes perform, it is a great show and a classic. The last time I saw it I enjoyed the new segments added, particularly the homage to the city of New York.

 

  • The Winter Village at Bryant Park/ New York Public Library on 5th- These should be seen together, I suggest visiting the shops at Bryant Park and entering the library after. The front entrance is decorated and has a beautifully decorated Christmas Tree.

 

  • Store Windows on 5th Ave -After you’ve seen Bryant Park and the library walk out onto Fifth  Ave and walk north towards all the holiday windows. Don’t miss Saks, Bergdorf Goodman and Tiffany & Co. Not on 5th but must see’s are Macy’s windows on 34th which has Santa Land inside. Bloomingdale’s also has gorgeous holiday windows on 1000 third ave and 59th st.

 

  • Grand Central Holiday Fair Market – Stay warm in this indoor holiday market located in Grand Central Station. I like to grab something to eat from the adjacent food vendors.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

 

Downtown

  • Wall Street Christmas Tree- Visit the Christmas tree on Wall Street. The surrounding buildings are decorated and are lit up at night. Don’t forget to pass Trinity Church which is also decorated and Zuccotti Park which has small Christmas trees that are lit in the evening.

 

  • Flat Iron District-Visit the tree at Madison Square Park. A tree lighting ceremony will take place Dec 6th from 3:30-5:30pm.

 

  • Ice Skate at the Standard The hotel in the Meatpacking district opens its skating rink to guests and the general public from December 20th to the end of March.

 

  • Union Square Holiday Market-Visit the market which runs until December 24th. Buy from local vendors and eateries, visit the kids art studio and heat up in the warming station and lounge.

 

Other Boroughs

  • Holiday Train Show– The New York Botanical Garden host the Holiday Train Show. It showcases miniature New York City landmarks all made of natural materials.

 

  • Vintage Subway Museum– Open year round, explore what subway cars used to look like in the main branch of the museum in downtown Brooklyn. If you plan to stay in Manhattan, visit the smaller museum at the Grand Central Gallery Annex and Store.

 

  • Astoria Holiday Market– A Holiday market in Astoria Queens that sells vintage goods and food. Open December 9th and 16th at the Bohemian Hall.

 

  • Winter Fest at the Brooklyn Museum– The Brooklyn Botanical Garden teams up with the Brooklyn Museum to create an indoor winter wonderland. Activities include live performances, food, a tree maze, Santaland and an array of activates for the whole family.

 

  • Dyker Heights Lights- Houses in Brooklyn are decorated with spectacular light shows. Great Christmas Light Fight anyone? Located on Dyker Heights Blvd from 83rd st-86th.

 

There are so many more things to do! Did I miss a must for you? Are you planning to visit NYC this Christmas season? Let me know in the comments an on social media!-T.S.

 

Travel

Renovated and Revived: South Street Seaport

If you follow my stories on Instagram you’ll know that last week I got to check out the newly open Pier 17 at South-Street Seaport. It’s been five years since it closed for renovations in 2013 after being hit by hurricane Sandy. Its been newly renovated with locals in mind as opposed to being a full on tourists spot. It was a day of taking my mom around to do touristy things like go to a museum that I never went to before, even though I use to walk by it everyday! Because lets face it, when you become so used to living or working in an iconic city, you forget and don’t realize how many historical attractions there are right in your backyard. That is something tourists and visitors don’t get wrong, visiting the historical and iconic spots. (Click pics to enlarge)

 

We finished our museum visits in the financial district and headed to South Street Seaport. If you are a tourists or potential tourists to this area, please don’t waste your money taking the subway or a taxi from the financial district to south street seaport. This is very walkable even at a leisurely pace and the blocks are a bit shorter, so enjoy the walk among the cobble stone streets and original architecture!

South Street Seaport and Pier 17 are not completely finished yet and some of the areas are still blocked off to the public as they continue renovations. Although what I saw was beautifully well done and has already done the area justice. I remember only a little bit about what it used to look like since I had not visited this area since I was little. I’ve worked in the financial district since, but like I mentioned before since its always there, I had not thought to go see what it looked like now. I don’t feel that bad though since it was under construction until its unveiling on June 30th 2018.

 

The pier itself has brand new boardwalk planks and the building is a airy with  glass windows that wraps around the building. While wood and glass continue running inside and follow outside to the back patio. Currently open are only the ground floor and the rooftop while the second floor shops are still under construction. The first floor holds the summer pop up, Market Hall restaurant and runs straight  into the back patio. Market Hall, which we ate at has a minimal menu curated by Chef David Kornell while the space itself has a nautical vibe. It was all delicious, the drinks which you can have in an alcoholic form as well were really refreshing and unlike any other drink I’ve ever had.

 

 

 

The back patio or River Lounge has rocker swings, lounge seats and the game cornhole for adults and kids alike to play. While a walk around will lead you to the Chase Sapphire Bar which held a ballon art installation by Geronimo and high seats to sit and watch the water. And the most impressive of it all, that Brooklyn Bridge and downtown Manhattan view. Also on the first floor is a Ticketmaster booth to  concert tickets for the south street seaport concert series. When you head up, unfortunately the middle floors are not finished, but you can head to the rooftop.

 

The rooftop holds stage space for concerts, intimate party space and spots to sit and take in the views. Once again the views are even more iconic as you get an above ground view of Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn and the Manhattan Bridge. The completed rooftop will include a restaurant, outdoor bars and will span 1.5 acres. I’m looking forward to seeing what it looks like when every section of South Street Seaport is open.

 

 

 

South Street Seaport Facts:

  • South Street Seaport is NY’s original commercial section

 

  • It was created in the 17th century and helped make NYC an economic powerhouse with the Dutch West India Company outpost that traded with old and new worlds

 

  • By the 1860’s the seaport was open 24/7,  making the Seaport District the first neighborhood that was open 24/7 in NYC. Dubbing NYC  “The city the never sleeps”.

 

  • By 1970’s the Seaport District created the urban renewal concept which preserved historical buildings while allowing developing real estate around them.

 

  • Once completely renovated the district will include 400,000 square feet of fashion, culinary, entertainment and cultural activities.

 

  • Restaurants by Andrew Carmellini, David Chong,Helene Henderson of the Momofuku Group and Jean- Georges Vongerichten are expected to open.

 

  • The experimental store 10 Corso Como by Carla Sozzani is  also expected to open

 

  • A 50,000 sq ft food hall by Jean -Georges  will open in the Tin Building

 

  • Pier 17 is ESPN’s new live broadcast studio

 

 

 

Steps away from Pier 17 the historic Fulton Street shops are also reopening. Some already open are the candy store It’s Sugar and the IPic theather, the Fulton Stall Market (Farmers Market) and much more. While new stores like the Sarah Jessica Parker (SJP) boutique are yet to open.

 

Hidden on the basement level of Pier 17 is Level 4 an event space with views of the Brooklyn Bridge, DUMBO, and the Statue of Liberty. Its purpose will be to be rented out and used as a venue for events.  Also rentable are the rooftop, Seaport Square at the entrance of Pier 17, and the Historic District :Beekman St.-John St. and South St. – Water St.

 

Make sure to check out my NYC highlight on Instagram to see more on the newly open South Street Seaport. Have you checked it out yet? Let me know in the comments and on social media. Learn more here.

T.S.

 

art fashion Fashion exhibit History The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination Part 2

heavenly bodies part 2

Currently on display at the Met Museum on Fifth and the Cloisters in the fashion exhibition Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination. Read part one here, the premise of this exhibition is fashions relationship with the Catholic religion and religions in general. Many of the designers showcased grew up in the Catholic church or still practice a belief. Items like Papal robes and other catholic dress were on loan to the museum. While the designer pieces were set among artifacts found in Medieval time periods or set in the Cloisters, a regal feeling building. To get a total understanding of how the exhibition flows, its best to visit both locations. Can’t make it? Keep reading, and don’t forget to read part one. Click images to enlarge.

 

Items From the Vatican.

These items were not allowed to be photographed. Only the artifact in the entrance was allowed to be photographed. Inside this portion of the exhibition were papal dress worn by Vatican Popes including crosses made of precious stones and gold, crowns, zucchetto skullcaps and various robes among other items.

Heavenly bodies

Chasuble Designed by Henri Matisse-1950

 

 

Treasures For Heaven I

Medieval churches held many treasures within them and like those found in the Cloisters, they inspired designers. Pieces that inspired them include alter frontals, stained glass, rosaries and more. This section included a piece by Alexander McQueen, which consisted of a S/S 1999 Ensemble made of plywood, leather, wood and lace. This piece was apart of the ‘No. 13″ collection where he explored the tension between man and machine. Pictures were not allowed.

 

Earthly Hierarchy

In this portion of the exhibition religious dress and color schemes are examined. It showcases the different religious dress within one religion, usually expressing a hierarchy and religious differences in dress between different religions. Focusing mainly on the Roman Catholic church where colors black, violet, white and scarlet are heavily used. They also highlight hue changes for specific occasions within Catholic proceedings.

 

 

The Habit

This religious dress worn by females usually consists of a tunic, a scapular or apron, a veil and a sash at the waist.

 

 

 

The Dominican Habit

Perhaps the most widely recognized Habit thanks to Hollywood is the Dominican Habit. Its black and white contrast has a  stronger visual appeal for designers, as opposed to the simple brown and plain white of other habits.

heavenly bodies part 2

Thom Browne A/W 2011-12

 

The Soutane

The  everyday dress of the secular clergy is the Soutane. Created in the late 12th century this garment usually has a white clerical collar, a floor length, long sleeves and 33 buttons. Daily dress is normally a black soutane with a sash and skullcap.

 

 

 

Ecclesiastical Fashion Show

The liturgical processions of the Roman Catholic Church have similarities to a fashion show. Both follow an orderly arrangement, involve active and passive participants and involve music. The following designs were put in a fashion show like order and were placed near the rolling film “Roma” by Federico Fellini in which there is an “ecclesiastical fashion show” scene.

 

 

 

 

Celestial Hierarchy I

Inspired by saints, angels and the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church. Angels, which usually are depicted as guides and messengers for humans, inspired many fashion designers.

 

 

The Dressed Madonna

Many designers created and continue to create garments for Madonna and Child sculptures. Featured here are vestments created by Ricardo Tisci and Yves Saint Laurent.

 

 

 

Celestial Hierarchy II

The designers showcased here were inspired by early Italian Renaissance paintings that were based on religious themes. Particularly inspiring were saints, angels, The Virgin and the work of painter Fra Angelico, who specified in frescos following this theme.

 

 

Mosaics I

Inspired by Byzantine art that showcases figures such as Christ, The Virgin Mary and more. Dolce and Gabbana were inspired by fresco paintings found in the Moreale Cathedral in Sicily.

 

 

Mosaics II 

The Gianni Versace dresses showcased here were inspired by mosaics of Ravenna’s Byzantine monuments. The mesh like material and cross take inspiration from elements Gianni saw in the Met when he visited “The Glory of Byzantium” exhibit in 1997.

 

 

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination will be on display at the Met on Fifth and the Cloisters until October 8th 2018. I hope you can check it out, and see how fashion is inspired by everything, even religion. Have you been able to visit the exhibit? What were your favorite parts? -T.S.

Fashion exhibit The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Met’s Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination Exhibition

It’s always said that there are certain things you shouldn’t talk about. Politics, money, family, and religion to name a few. Perhaps because these are highly personal decisions, that when revealed can draw a striking line between people. Although opinions always differ by who is viewing that topic and who interprets it. That is exactly what the exhibition Heavenly Bodies is, an interpretation on religion through the translation of fashion.  It is also an exclusive view into Papal dress and ceremonial items with the blessing of the Vatican. Many of the designers that contributed pieces to the exhibition, were raised in the Roman Catholic church or similar religions. Of which they used the physical symbolism, garments, and the religious orders to inspire their work.

 

The exhibition spans the Met on Fifth and the Met Cloisters. The Met on Fifth hosts the papal portion of the exhibition and designer items spread out among the Anna Wintour Costume Center, The Medieval and Byzantine Art Wing and the Robert Lehman Wing, while the Cloisters hosts designer items showcased near artworks, architecture or similar pieces that directly inspired them. Some corresponding categories were split between both museums, so to understand the order you should visit both. The Cloisters was a perfect place to hold this exhibition as the building itself is reminiscent of a medieval castle or antique church. I talk about the Cloisters and how you can visit all three Met Museums in this post! (Click images to enlarge, press esc to go back)

 

The Cloisters part of the exhibition:

 

The Dressed Madonna II

This  Viktor & Rolf dress references  the Madonna and Child symbolism popular in the Middle Ages in Western Europe. To translate this symbol the designers created the ” Russian Doll Collection”, in which they took inspiration from the Madonna nesting a child in her lap as well as the traditional Russian Nesting Doll.

 

Holy Sacraments I

The designers in this portion of the exhibit were inspired by the act of Baptism. Karl Lagerfeld by the dresses worn by girls in France and Cristobal Balenciaga by the figures of the Virgin he saw in church processions.

 

 

 

 

Holy Sacraments  II

This Marc Bohan dress was part of his debut collection for Dior. It is named the ” Hymenee” after the Hellenistic god of marriage. Although there are also inspirations from the nun and monk habit.

 

 

 

 

Cult of the Virgin 

The dresses displayed here are from the Jean Paul Gaultier S/S 2007 Haute Couture collection ” Les Vierges” ( The Virgins). Inspired by the Blessed Virgin Mary. Each detail of the dress representing Mary, the blue, halo, veil and heart all an iconography depicting stages of her life.

 

 

 

 

Religious Orders

 

I couldn’t get close to all of these pieces, which included designers Rick Owens, Madame Gres, Valentina, Geoffrey Beene, Claire McCardell, and Pierpaolo Piccioli. These designers were largely inspired by simplicity and specifically for these pieces, the monastery.

 

The Crusades II

Craig Greene is continually inspired by Christian figures such as King Arthur. He mixes religious and military inspirations, practically the Orthodox Church with Islamic carpets for these pieces. Mixing both military and different religions.

 

Sacred/Secular

Inspired by the tapestry “The Unicorn in Captivity”. A piece of art that has been interpreted by Christianity and Secular groups to represent different meanings. This Thom Browne wedding dress mixes both meanings, Christ (Christian meaning) and a happy groom bonded by marriage (secular meaning).

 

Mary Mother of God

Inspiration for these pieces come from Mary, Mother of God. Chanel was inspired by stain glass windows found in a church in Germany. The windows depict Mary in a blue gown with wheat. Grain is a representation of the nourishment Mary gave and God’s bounty.

 

 

 

The Annunciation

Inspired by the Annunciation Triptych a Netherlandish painting. Mainly the subjects of the red robe of the virgin and the wings of an angel. The volume of both of these subjects is depicted by the feather outlines of the dress. It was also inspired by the painting Hans Memling’s Virgin and Child Enthroned with Two Angels.

 

 

 

 

 

Gothic Art and Fashion:

This part of the exhibition held designs by Alexander McQueen that were not allowed to be photographed. Alexander McQueen was inspired by religion, specifically the religions found in Netherland inspired paintings. On display in this section of the exhibition are pieces from his A/W 2010/11 collection that was showed after his death in Feb of 2010. Specific inspiration came from altar pieces and religious paintings and McQueen’s constant pursue of translating death and the after-life.

 

 

 

 

 

The Garden of Eden

These pieces were inspired by paintings that depicted Adam and Eve and the garden in which they resided.

 

 

The Crusades I

Inspired by armored giant of the d’Aluye family in France who crusaded across Europe preaching the gospel. This practice lasted three generations.

 

 

Treasures For Heaven II

This part of the exhibition focused on the objects or treasures churches held. Such as  carved wood, silver, gold reliquaries, and ceremonial vessels. Pieces made by medieval artists found within these treasures and more inspired these designers.

I’ll have a separate post on the items found at the Met on Fifth included in this exhibition. Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination will be open until October 8th.- T. S.

Travel

My Stay at Club Quarters Midtown

CQ Hotel

Two weekends ago I stayed at a Club Quarters Hotel in midtown due to consecutive events, the Jeval Beauty Event and the Puerto Rican Day Parade. One that my mom wanted to attend and the other she ended up attending anyway. Due to these events she thought it would be a good idea to stay close to at least one of these locations instead of paying for transportation twice. And being that I left the Jeval event around almost 10 pm and had to be at my meeting point for the parade at 8 am, I was glad she suggested it. Now don’t get me wrong, I would have still found a way to make both work but this option was less exhausting, for the both of us. She found a great priced room at Club Quarters Hotel located on the same block as Radio City Music Hall via Priceline. Learn about this cute hotel below! Locals let me know if you’ve stayed in this hotel and what other hotels you’ve stayed in to make an event or your workload easier. This is not a sponsored post I just happen to really like this hotel!

 

Amenities/ Extras

Here are the in-room amenities available to guests. The room comes stocked with an iron, ironing board, extra blankets and pillows. They also offer the option of leaving garments to be left for cleaning or to be put in storage, as well as same day and overnight dry cleaning with a laundry bag already located in your room. Their fitness room is small and doesn’t have any spectacular views but its open 24/7. They supply every room with a yoga mat and the gym is equipped with machines, refillable water bottles, towels, a scale and more yoga mats. The room also came equipped with a desk with a charging station, lamp and comfortable chair. I planned to use this convience but ended up being too exhausted to work at the end of the night.

The next amenity that I thought was very considerate and that I wished I would have asked for was the option to receive a “Sleep Better Kit”. This includes a humidifier, air purifier, and sound therapy machine. I was so exhausted the night before the parade that I didn’t think to ask for any of these, but I wish I would have asked for a sound machine. I sleep with one at home and it really helps me rest. It also would have helped block out the sound of playing kids next to us and the sudden police sirens… because duh NEW YORK CITY. But exhaustion, melatonin and turning on the air for the sound took over shortly.

I didn’t get a chance to take advantage of their dining options which included the following. The Terrace Club on the rooftop which had views of the city or the attached restaurant Johnny Utah’s next to the lobby. Room service and the ability to use the service/ app Seamless and have it delivered to your room was also an option. For convenience they also offer chilled, purified water machines on all floors as well as ice machines and buckets.

The final amenities were that of the business services. The hotel came equipped with free WIFI as well as wireless and Airpinting. They also have meeting facilities and a Club Living Room with work stations complete with universal charging stations and refreshments. These I didn’t get to check out, but I’m sure would be useful for large meetings and extra space for working. They provide four types of rooms as well as corporate apartments which can be booked for a 30 day stay or longer. Gold Rewards are offered to employees and guest of member organizations. Gold Reward perks include free nights, upgrades and gift cards to retailers

 

The App

Club Quarters Hotels has a corresponding app. The CQ Hotels app allows you to check in or out without having to go to the front desk. It also allows you to keep track of your reservations and your rewards points. The app can be used for any hotel under the CQ branch as well a partner hotels. CQ Hotels has hotels in multiple locations of New York Boston, Chicago, London, Philadelphia, San Francisoco and Washington DC. All giving you options to check in, find directions to the hotel and parking as well as order an Uber. The app also informs users about the hotel and what it offers as well as the ability to connect with guest services when you are in the hotel. You can control the tv with a remote via the app and you can also download a mobile key for the room. Finally you can find things  to do with suggestions by the hotel like to where to eat, enjoy night life and shop. There are also recommendations by TripAdvisor within the app.

CQ Hotel

 

The Room

The room itself I absolutely loved because it was tidy, clean, stylish and well stocked. I absolutely hate when I go to a hotel and there are not enough towels or you have to call for something to be brought up, changed, fixed, etc. When you walk into the room, just like when you meet someone you have first impressions and these were great. I loved how much sunlight came into the room and the fact that we could see Rockefeller Center and the NBC Building. I also loved how well light and modern both the room and bathroom were. The bed was well made and positioned well with multiple lighting options in the night stands. The desk was one of my favorite parts because it was functional and inspiring. If you’ve read my office space post I tell you a bit of how I have it set up. And this office space was similar, clean, inspiring and comfortable with a charging station! They also furnished the room with an extra chair and coffee station with a Keurig while the tv recognized you each time you turned it on. I also liked the color scheme which matched that of the office art and was relaxing.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

Things to do/ Things Near By/ Transportation

The hotel is perfectly located in midtown near Radio City Music Hall and Rockerfeller Center. Its also walking distance to Fifth Ave and Times Square/Broadway. Not to far from Times Square is Bryant Park and The New York Public Library. Also not far is Macys’, Herald Square and the Flat Iron Building.  All along midtown where the hotel is situated are things tourist aren’t goin to want to miss.  The hotel is also a block away from the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) if you care to stop into a museum. While Central Park is only six blocks away if you want to walk to the beginning of the park. The closest subways are the D, F and the E, M which can take you up and down Manhattan. If you have a little girl or daughter with you, you many want to go into American Girl which is on the same block as the hotel! Not far is also the famous Momofuku Milk Bar, Nobu, St.Patricks Cathedral and sooo much more. Another point to make is since this hotel is situated on a street and not an avenue and not right on top on Times Square it was a little less crowded. Two blocks away from the hotel is also a Enterprise Rent-A-Car if you prefer to drive instead of taking public transportation.

 

I hope this helps you if you are looking for hotel options! Have you ever stayed at a Club Quarters Hotel? What was your experience like? If not, I highly recommend it!- T.S.

 

 

Event Travel

Mazda Brunch

Mazda

This is a Sponsored Post featuring Mazda

 

Saturday I attended a Brunch with Mazda and DiMe Media at the New Leaf Restaurant in the Fort Tryon state park of upper Manhattan. Bloggers got to view their newest cars and learn about the company. Mazda, a Japanese car company has been around since 1920 but did not become a full auto maker until 1946. It was birthed in Hiroshima Japan, and during WWII it was one of the only buildings left standing. Mazda which was pioneered by Dr.  Kenichi Yamamoto and Felix Wankel became the first company to invent the rotary engine. 47 Engineers or Samurai as they were nicknamed, along with these two masterminds perfected the engine.

Mazda, a relatively smaller car company compared to other massive manufactures, takes up only 2% of th U.S. car market. Reaching a niche market whose core values of perseverance, passion, harmony and family align with theirs. Values that are of high importance in the Latino community as well.  The purchasing power of Latinos/ Hispanics grew to over $13.9 trillion in 2016 and is expected to grow to over $16.6 trillion or more by 2021. With these stats and aligning values it is easy to why Mazda and the Latino community merge well together.

 

And like business people who reinvent themselves to survive, Mazda has reievented itself with continuing to create new technology. Through various economic crisis Mazda continually reinvented their cars to be more cost and fuel efficent for their customer. During the mid 70’s oil crisis they unveiled the GLC model. During the 90’s they unveiled the ultra popular Miata. During the 2000’s financial collapse, they reveled the economic Skyactiv technology. All while making sure their customers, people who love to drive get exactly that feeling of freedom in driving.

The day consisted of a Ride and Drive experience, Mazda educational presentation, 3 course brunch and trivia with prizes. I won a bottle of  Secret Cellars cabernet sauvignon 2015 in a gorgeous leather Callaway wine carrier. With thanks to the ladies there who helped me answer the question! The delicious meal consisted of a Baby Spinach Salad, an entrees choice of Spring Linguini with Peas, Pan Seared Salmon with peas and asparagus or NY Strip Steak with mashed potatoes and vegetables. The meal was topped with a chocolate mousse cake that was hard not to devour!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

The following were the cars bloggers got to ride and drive. I drove the Mazda CX-3 and fell in love at first push of the start button. It was my first time driving a Mazda, so I was not sure what to expect. Perhaps I expected a sports car with a lot of power. But what I got was power, agility and a smooth ride. Now ask anyone who drives or has been driven around New York City, its never a smooth ride! Although with a Mazda the pot hole filled roads are not as bad. I also rode in some of the other cars with fellow blogger Renee of Getting Fit Fab.

All Mazda’s come with Kodo (soul of motion) design and Skyactiv technology. The Skyactiv technology with G-Vectoring control, was something I experience when it warned me and subtly adjusted my steering while turning. It also works to adjust the cars power and weight as you make turns and take curves. This technology was made with the Japanese “Jinba Ittati” or “horse and rider as one” philosophy in mind.

The cars showcased at the brunch were the following: Mazda CX-5, Mazda CX-3, Mazda 3 as well as the Mazda 6, Mazda MX, Mazda CX-9 and the Mazda MX-5 Miata.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

What’s in the future for Mazda? Diesel friendly cars, hybrids and co-pilot installed technology that can pull the car over when the driver is in trouble. You might say “well why haven’t they unveiled these already?” That is because they have yet to perfect these concepts. Mazda, true to their core values does not unveil new technology without it being tested and perfected. With awards for “Best Car Brand in 2017″ by U.S. News and World Report and ” Most Fuel Efficient Auto Manufacturer” by the EPA among other awards, it wont be long until their upcoming releases receive accolades as well. I’ll be attending the NY Auto Show later this month, so stay tuned for more Mazda loving posts.

 

 

T.S.