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Fashion exhibit The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Met’s Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination Exhibition

It’s always said that there are certain things you shouldn’t talk about. Politics, money, family, and religion to name a few. Perhaps because these are highly personal decisions, that when revealed can draw a striking line between people. Although opinions always differ by who is viewing that topic and who interprets it. That is exactly what the exhibition Heavenly Bodies is, an interpretation on religion through the translation of fashion.  It is also an exclusive view into Papal dress and ceremonial items with the blessing of the Vatican. Many of the designers that contributed pieces to the exhibition, were raised in the Roman Catholic church or similar religions. Of which they used the physical symbolism, garments, and the religious orders to inspire their work.

 

The exhibition spans the Met on Fifth and the Met Cloisters. The Met on Fifth hosts the papal portion of the exhibition and designer items spread out among the Anna Wintour Costume Center, The Medieval and Byzantine Art Wing and the Robert Lehman Wing, while the Cloisters hosts designer items showcased near artworks, architecture or similar pieces that directly inspired them. Some corresponding categories were split between both museums, so to understand the order you should visit both. The Cloisters was a perfect place to hold this exhibition as the building itself is reminiscent of a medieval castle or antique church. I talk about the Cloisters and how you can visit all three Met Museums in this post! (Click images to enlarge, press esc to go back)

 

The Cloisters part of the exhibition:

 

The Dressed Madonna II

This  Viktor & Rolf dress references  the Madonna and Child symbolism popular in the Middle Ages in Western Europe. To translate this symbol the designers created the ” Russian Doll Collection”, in which they took inspiration from the Madonna nesting a child in her lap as well as the traditional Russian Nesting Doll.

 

Holy Sacraments I

The designers in this portion of the exhibit were inspired by the act of Baptism. Karl Lagerfeld by the dresses worn by girls in France and Cristobal Balenciaga by the figures of the Virgin he saw in church processions.

 

 

 

 

Holy Sacraments  II

This Marc Bohan dress was part of his debut collection for Dior. It is named the ” Hymenee” after the Hellenistic god of marriage. Although there are also inspirations from the nun and monk habit.

 

 

 

 

Cult of the Virgin 

The dresses displayed here are from the Jean Paul Gaultier S/S 2007 Haute Couture collection ” Les Vierges” ( The Virgins). Inspired by the Blessed Virgin Mary. Each detail of the dress representing Mary, the blue, halo, veil and heart all an iconography depicting stages of her life.

 

 

 

 

Religious Orders

 

I couldn’t get close to all of these pieces, which included designers Rick Owens, Madame Gres, Valentina, Geoffrey Beene, Claire McCardell, and Pierpaolo Piccioli. These designers were largely inspired by simplicity and specifically for these pieces, the monastery.

 

The Crusades II

Craig Greene is continually inspired by Christian figures such as King Arthur. He mixes religious and military inspirations, practically the Orthodox Church with Islamic carpets for these pieces. Mixing both military and different religions.

 

Sacred/Secular

Inspired by the tapestry “The Unicorn in Captivity”. A piece of art that has been interpreted by Christianity and Secular groups to represent different meanings. This Thom Browne wedding dress mixes both meanings, Christ (Christian meaning) and a happy groom bonded by marriage (secular meaning).

 

Mary Mother of God

Inspiration for these pieces come from Mary, Mother of God. Chanel was inspired by stain glass windows found in a church in Germany. The windows depict Mary in a blue gown with wheat. Grain is a representation of the nourishment Mary gave and God’s bounty.

 

 

 

The Annunciation

Inspired by the Annunciation Triptych a Netherlandish painting. Mainly the subjects of the red robe of the virgin and the wings of an angel. The volume of both of these subjects is depicted by the feather outlines of the dress. It was also inspired by the painting Hans Memling’s Virgin and Child Enthroned with Two Angels.

 

 

 

 

 

Gothic Art and Fashion:

This part of the exhibition held designs by Alexander McQueen that were not allowed to be photographed. Alexander McQueen was inspired by religion, specifically the religions found in Netherland inspired paintings. On display in this section of the exhibition are pieces from his A/W 2010/11 collection that was showed after his death in Feb of 2010. Specific inspiration came from altar pieces and religious paintings and McQueen’s constant pursue of translating death and the after-life.

 

 

 

 

 

The Garden of Eden

These pieces were inspired by paintings that depicted Adam and Eve and the garden in which they resided.

 

 

The Crusades I

Inspired by armored giant of the d’Aluye family in France who crusaded across Europe preaching the gospel. This practice lasted three generations.

 

 

Treasures For Heaven II

This part of the exhibition focused on the objects or treasures churches held. Such as  carved wood, silver, gold reliquaries, and ceremonial vessels. Pieces made by medieval artists found within these treasures and more inspired these designers.

I’ll have a separate post on the items found at the Met on Fifth included in this exhibition. Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination will be open until October 8th.- T. S.

art Fashion exhibit The Metropolitan Museum of Art Travel

How to visit all three NYC Met Museums within 2-3 Days

the met

Last week I did something I do quite often, visit the Met Museum every year to view their largest Costume Institute exhibition. Before they open this exhibition the museum host the MET Gala. Yes that Gala in which you ask yourself why are these celebrities dressing up or dressing weirdly? I’ll break it down a bit for people who are not in the fashion, media, art..etc world. Every year the Metropolitan Museum of Art features a few exhibitions, and one very large one. Anna Wintour from Vogue, board members and the Met Museum decide on a theme or designer to focus on or honor with the exhibition. In the past they have focused on Asia and Asian inspired fashion with China Through the Looking Glass or one of their most visited exhibitions Savage Beauty on Alexander McQueen after his death.  To attend this event, celebrities have to be invited by Anna Wintour and the team, of which they decide who sits where and they also depict the dress code, usually in connection to the theme of the exhibition. This years exhibition Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination, inspired many celebrities to dress in Pope like attire. Some celebrities embrace the theme while others don’t, I personally love those that do. In order to attend this gala, celebrities pay around $30,000 per ticket which benefits the Costume Institute. This year the exhibition spans two locations of the Met Museum. The largest part of the  exhibition taking place at The Met on 5th ave and the second at The Met Cloisters in upper Manhattan. I was determined to visit them both and because I thought The Met Bruer had part of the exhibition I ended up visiting all three within two days. How can you do this? I’ll give you my tips below.

 

There are a few ways you can accomplish this and I am going to suggest one way for New Yorkers and one way for tourists. I think of it this way because normally New Yorkers will know which subways to take and how to find these subways quickly. Where as if you are a visitor you will probably need some time to figure out which subway to take, where you have to catch it, where you have to get off and where to go once off etc. If you are savy with directions or have a great app to help you it can speed up the process. I just suggest taking this into consideration and the fact that NYC blocks are a mile long and you’ll be looking up at buildings and not walking as fast. Now if you feel you want to do this in a different manner, go right ahead but after some thought and doing this myself these are my suggestions. With one Met Museum ticket you can visit all three locations within three consecutive days, thanks to its ticket policy. One ticket gets you into all three! So this means you only have to pay to get into one museum no matter which, and transportation. Take advantage of this and make sure to KEEP THE RECEIPT as each museum will ask for the receipt when you mention this policy!

 

Tourist: Your first stop should be the Met Breuer, the smallest of the three. This museum holds modern art including Picasso’s. The museum is small with only a few floors, with one currently closed for construction. It also has many large sculptures as opposed to alot of paintings, which in my opinion made the process of reading about and viewing the piece faster. It only took me an hour an a half to complete the museum, but you might be going a bit slower than I did so I’d say give yourself 2-3 hours here. It probably won’t take you longer than that because like I said, its small. If your hungry check out the café which has a patio area on the basement level of the museum.

 

Your next stop should be the Met on Fifth. The Met on Fifth is only seven blocks away from the Met Breuer, save yourself money and walk there! If its good whether, you won’t regret it, as the architecture of the upper east side is beautiful and the townhouse lined streets are peaceful. I love walking to the Met because of this simple fact, its like getting a quick peaceful break before you cross into the bustle of Museum Mile on fifth. The Met on Fifth is the largest of the museums and it is going to take you the rest of the day to get through it. Some of my favorite parts of the museum include the Costume Institute if there’s a fashion exhibition, the Egyptian Art wing, the Charles Engelhard Court in the American wing, the Medieval Art wing and the rooftop. The rooftop is open May-October and sometimes holds exhibitions while the views of the city are incredible.

 

By the time you are done with the Met on Fifth you’ll probably be too tired or it will be too late to attempt to go uptown as the MET closes at 5:30pm (Sun-Thurs) and the Met Cloisters at 5:15pm. You might feel like you didn’t see everything at the Met on Fifth and want to come back the second day. You are going to want to leave the Met Cloisters for the third day, as it takes a while to get up there and because it deserves a slow stroll through the grounds. The Met Cloisters is located inside Fort Tyron park in upper Manhattan, literally almost at the very end of Manhattan. From the Met on Fifth to the Cloisters the subway ride will take around an hour, and from the subway to the museum you are walking uphill. Give yourself time to walk slowly and take in the views of the flowers and nature of the park. I’m assuming you can take a taxi up but why would you, when you’ll miss the views and the nature. NOTE: Once you get off the train follow the signs that say Cloisters to find the elevator inside the subway station that will take you up to the entry of the park. If you attempt to walk from the subway, it will take long and it might be confusing. The park also has many hills and steps and you will be EXHAUSTED by the time you get there. I’ve walked there both ways and highly suggest finding that elevator!  Take your time in this museum, its small but gorgeous as it is filled with medieval art and the gardens and the architecture of the building are impeccably detailed.

 

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Local: YOU GOT THIS! I did it!

Now you may like the suggestions I made for tourists, and by all means follow them. But as a person who enters NYC via midtown I prefer going all the way up to the Met Cloisters first and coming back down to the Met Breuer in one day. Now the Met Cloisters connects via the A subway which runs on the west side of Manhattan, but the Met Breuer is on the east side. You would need to transfer to the C or B subway at some point or get off near Central Park and cross. It doesn’t take long if you walk NYC pace! I still enjoyed the park and I made it to the Met Breuer with hours to spare. From the east side of the park to the Met Breuer its only one block away. I did it this way and felt I saw everything both museums had to offer and got to stop and admire sections of the park I hadn’t before. I visited the Met on Fifth on a separate day, I suggest doing the same due to how big it is. Since I know my way around the museum on fifth, I knew exactly what I wanted to see. What I didn’t know and what you might not have realized is the ticket price for local NEW YORKERS is pay as you wish. College students of the NY, NJ and CT area can also pay as they wish. For non-New Yorkers it cost $25 to enter the museum, but like I mentioned above keep that ticket and receipt because it gets you into all three museums. This policy is fairly new, and a lot of people think it’s still pay as you wish for everyone, it is NOT. But it is well worth it if you visit all the museums!

 

Don’t miss the Picasso’s and Degas’s at the Met Breuer! They have the famous The Little Fourteen Year Old Dancer sculpture by Degas along with other modern art. The museum is the smallest of the three, with many sculptures and a floor currently under construction. You might be finished with more than enough time to visit the Met on Fifth! Take your time at the Cloisters, its like stepping out of New York and into a European medieval castle. The museum itself is small, but you are going to want to take in the details and beauty of the architecture, art and grounds. While Fort Tyron park is beautiful on its own. When at the Met on Fifth make sure to visit the Egyptian and Medieval sections and the rooftop, you wont’ regret that rooftop!

 

 

 

 

In whatever manner you visit the MET Museums I highly suggest you take advantage of the ticket policy. Locals who are just looking for something to do on a weekend or looking for ways to educate their kids are going to enjoy these museums. While tourists visiting for the first time are not going to want to miss the MET, it is a MUST. I hope this post encourages you to visit at least the MET on FIFTH, as I’ve been visiting this museum since I was a little girl and it is still one of my favorite places on earth.

 

Trains: A,B,C

Time: 2-3 Days

Cost: $25 per ticket + subway ride $2.75 per ride + if you are coming from outside NYC.

 

I will have a separate post on the Heavenly Bodies : Fashion and the Catholic Imagination. Have you ever visited all three museums as a local or tourists? Let me know in the comments and on social media!- T.S.

 

Event fashion Uncategorized

Bandelettes Annual Gala

bandelettes

Sponsored post featuring Bandelettes.

Ladies! Lets chat real quick on how much we love the thigh gap! NOT!! In fact I’m pretty sure that most of you ladies reading this are perfectly fine with not having a thigh gap. As you should be, because lord knows we don’t all need to look like the original Barbie. As someone who has worked on multiple sides of the fashion industry, including production of clothing I have seen how the industry has struggled to get the correct sizing for plus size women. But slowly over the years with voices like that of Ashley Graham, screaming load and proud about her natural curves the industry is changing. Because there is one thing that all women want, to feel beautiful! As a Bandelettes model told us at the end of the night ” I want to wear sexy clothes too!” As a professional FIT model, she has grown an understanding of how clothes are supposed to feel and fall on the body. Which also means she knows how many times a brand has to fix or remake clothing to correctly fit a plus size woman. Getting it right the first time in what women needed was Bandelettes. This genius invention of sexy thigh bands allows you to wear your skirts and dresses without fear of chafing! No more uncomfortable sweating or painful cuts or having to wear shorts under your cute skirts, dresses or shorts.

 

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Created by Rena Abramoff and Julia Abasova, these boss women came from their native countries with non fashion backgrounds. Once they met, they knew they had to create something groundbreaking which lead to the creation of Bandelettes. With a body positive message behind the brand it didn’t take long for women including Project Runway designer Ashley Nell Tipton to take notice. She made an appearance at their first Annual Gala with testimonials on how much she loved the brand. And her tune has not changed as she and the brand recently unveiled her own limited edition designs earlier this month.

The annual gala was held downtown at the recently opened event space, The Mezzanine in the financial district. Special guests included Becca McCharen-Tran, designer and creator of the boundary pushing brand Chromat. The CFDA Fashion Fund Alumni first partnered with Bandelettes last September when she sent models down the runway in the SS18 Serenity collection accessorized with Bandelettes. The partnership, a merriment of body positive brands continued in the AW18 Wavy collection and hasn’t stopped breaking molds since. Becca was the absolute sweetest and took a picture with me! Also in attendance was drag queen extraordinaire Coco De’Ball who performed. The drink of the night was a strong “Thigh-Piranha”, a take on a Brazilian cocktail. While a fun photobooth, a great DJ, hor d’oeuvres (that I and other bloggers stuffed our faces with) and cupcakes with mini sugar Bandelettes filled the room.

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I seriously can’t say enough how Bandelettes have saved my thighs during the warmer months. A question I was asked by a fellow blogger was “Can you see the lines under your dress”? And honestly I’ve worn a pencil skirt with Bandelettes and they were not visable at all. Thanks to the thin fabric and strudy silicone bands they are virtually invisable and stay in place. Bandelettes come in a range of colors and designs from neutral to bold, thanks to their designer collaborations. And ever the inclusive brand they come in sizes A-F (pantyhose sizes). Have you tried Bandelettes? Let me know in the comments and on social media. Read more about Sparkling Carla here and read more about Bandelettes here!

– T.S.

*Click to view individually

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Mothers Day Gift Ideas for the Fashionista: Target Edition

Mothers Day is approaching and if you are like my mother and I, you love Target! Here are some of my top picks for gifts from Target. Trendy yet classic these are perfect for any mom and her closet. Let me know what you love! I want EVERYTHING! Perhaps you’ll buy one for you and one for your mother! There is nothing wrong with that, style has no age.  Affiliate links are included within this post.

 

 

 

Striped Strappy Dress – Universal Thread-$27.99- Perfect for morning brunch!

Women’s 3/4 Sleeve Windowpane Dress – K by Kersh-$49.99- Great for the mom whose a business woman.

Who What Wear Women’s Sandra Striped Wrap Heeled Pumps – Black $37.99- These will easily become her go-to’s for the spring.

Eden Heeled Ankle Strap Sandals by Who What Wear $37.99- Elegant and subtle for the weddings she has to attend this spring.

Who What Wear Coco Grograin Kitten Heeled Mules $37.99- Moms who love a great vintage inspired trend will love these!

Women’s Jolie Ankle Strap – Who What Wear Black $34.99.  I tried these on and wish they had them in my size!!! The trend setting momma will be all over these.

Women’s Plus Size Long Ruffle Sleeve Pullover Top – Who What Wear $29.99- Feminine and classic all in one, pair it with different cami’s!

Women’s Sophia Crossbody Bag – Who What Wear-$34.99- A classic style in classic colors!

Cesca Medium Satchel With Stitching Detailing $39.99- Classic colors, trendy details.

Double Flap Shoulder Crossbody Bag – A New Day Bone $29.99- Trendy, but this will always come back into style thanks to its simplicity.

I’ll have another Target based Mothers Day Gift Guide soon. Happy Shopping!

Fashion exhibit The Museum at FIT

Norell: Dean of American Fashion

Considered the “American Balenciaga” Norman Norell was the father of creating ready-to-wear with haute couture techniques and quality. His collections were worn by celebrities, first ladies and were featured in many films and tv shows during the 50’s and 60’s. His creations and improvements on ready-to-wear clothing and their everlasting impact of fashion revel him the Dean of American Fashion.

With a background in costume creation Norell chose only the best fabrics for his ready to wear collections. Every detail down to the lining of each garment was made in his NYC atelier. Although his work was worthy of boutique prices, Norell insisted his collections be sold to the masses in department stores. A lover of the past and yet ahead of his time Norell drew inspiration from 1920’s and designed culottes in the 1960’s, pants that would only be popular years later.

After the Indiana native moved to New York to gain a fashion design education he quickly moved into costume designing. Although by 1928 his career as a fashion designer began when he designed for Hattie Carnegie, a prestigious New York fashion house.

Norell for Hattie Carnegie

Norell

Norell for Hattie Carnegie 1932

Norell

Norell for Hattie Carnegie 1939. Gingham Hostess Gown

 

 

Before creating his own line Norell worked with garment manufacturer Anthony Traina in 1941. Under this partnership they created the Traina Norell label.

Triana-Norell New York

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Right-Traina-Norell NY Off-white sailor dress 1957

 

By 1960 Norell bought out Traina and created the Norell line.

Norman Norell New York

Norell

Norman Norell NY black rhinestone dress, 1972.
Norell: Mink fur and velvet evening coat, 1970.

Norell

Norman Norell New York. Nutmeg Sheth Dress 1965. Turned inside out showcasing the silk lining put into his creations. This was one of the many hand applied couture details Norell put into his garments.

Norell

Norman Norell NY 1960-64.The ‘mermaid” gown was one of Norell’s signature pieces. The style was inspired by Hollywood glamour, which he created into ready-to-wear. It was one of his most popular creations.

Norell

Norman Norell NY: Camel suit 1972 and heather 1969 suit. Techniques here included lining the jackets in sequins.

Norell

Both Norman Norell NY 1966. In these pieces he used silhouettes that originated in the 1920’s. These belonged to actress Lauren Bacall.

 

 

 

Norell

Norell: Double breasted coat 1963-67. In the 1940’s followed the trend of infusing menswear into women’s garments. His wool coats are some of his best menswear infused pieces.

norell

Norman Norell NY 1968 Sailor Gown. Inspired by the sailor suits he wore as a child.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are the styles that Norell perfected with his couture techniques and ready to wear collections:

  • Mermaid Gowns
  • Culottes
  • Wool Jersey and Colorblocking
  • Flappers
  • Fur Trims
  • Double Sided Breasted Silhouette
  • Pant Suits
  • Shaped Suits
  • Wedged Shaped Coats
  • The Pussycat Bow
  • Belts
  • Collars and Capes
  • Color Choices
  • Sailor Suit
  • Kimono Style Wrap dress
  • The Perfect Little Black Dress
  • Empire Waist
  • Full Skirts
  • Fantasy Coats
  • The Ultimate Evening Skirt
  • Mermaids

Scroll through the slideshows to see the styles mentioned above designed for the Norman Norell, Triana and Hattie Carniege collections.

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This highly respected and beloved American Couturier won the Coty Award five times and a honorary doctorate from the Pratt Institute. He was also the second president of the Council of fashion designers of America and celebrated by the Metropolitan Museum of Art amongst many other accolades. Norell: Dean of American Fashion is open until April 14, 2018 at the Museum at FIT.

T.S.

fashion Uncategorized

How to Style This Target Mossimo Sweater 4 Ways

target

A good sweater can become your go-to-piece during these cold winter months. A sweater that is comfy, warm and can go with everything, what more can you ask for? So by now you should know I have an obsession with Target. It is a dangerous place for my wallet and I! I recently went on a Target run, for items that had nothing to do with clothes. But alas I can’t help but check out what they have. Luckily they were having a sale on their clothes (still are) in particular sweaters. I don’t really have enough pull over sweaters that I can throw on. So I made it my mission to find one during the great sale.

I was not disappointed, as I left the store with a piece that I’ve already worn more than once. The side tie pullover sweater is not only stylish but is veryyyyyyyy warm. It’s so warm in fact that I’ve worn it without a coat while leaving my house, in November! That alone tells me that the sweater was well made, making it worth the original price. Here are 4 ways I’ve styled the sweater.

 

1. For The Office

I’ve worn this exact outfit to work and loved it. The billowy sweater gets balanced out with slim straight legged pants. The sweater wouldn’t work with a billowy skirt as the massive amount on both the top and bottom half of my body would overwhelm my small frame. I would also pair it with a black or dark grey business pant to offset the light grey color of the sweater. You can also do a monochromatic look and pair the sweater with a similar shade of grey pant.

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Target sweater, Pant(don’t know, there is no tag), Hat: Target, Grey pumps: Primark

 

2. A Weekend Errand Run

Now some ladies choose to believe that “leggings are pants”  while others believe “leggings are not pants!” I’m usually on the latter side except for when it comes to this extremely warm sweater. If you do choose to pair the sweater with leggings I suggest a fleece lined pair like the ones I have on and a tall boot. Both combined with the sweater will keep you toasty. I don’t suggest a short boot, as a tall boot keeps you warmer.

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Target sweater, standard fleece lined legging, Candies boots.

 

3. Night Out

Don’t think you can wear a chunky sweater for a fun night out of drinks? Why not? For this look I paired the sweater with black moto jeans which adds a tougher feel to the soft sweater. Once again the type of pant you wear is key so go with a skinny jean, that doesn’t fight with the billowy top. Slip on a pair of killer pumps and your ready to turn heads!

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Target sweater, H&M moto jean, Aldo pumps, Mulberry & Grand shades.

 

4. Lunch get together

I’m an advocate for transitioning clothes into different seasons. If you follow me on Instagram you’ve seen me wear a mini skirt in the fall. The same can be done in the winter, just make sure to layer your leggings and tights! I wanted to give the look a more relaxed feel so a pair of Tim’s were a clear choice for me.

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Target sweater, Forever21 mini skit, Timberland boots.

How would you style this sweater from Target? Let me know in the comments and social media.

T.S.

 

 

 

 

 

art fashion Fashion exhibit Travel Uncategorized

Louis Vuitton Exhibition Rooms 6-10

If you pay attention to fashion news you probably already know that the Louis Vuitton exhibition, that has been a hit in other international cities has made its way to New York City. I made my way to the exhibition twice already and plan to go back before it closes. I wrote a review of the first 5 rooms of the exhibit which you can read here. The following is an overview of the next 5 rooms, which concludes the exhibition.

 

The Painting Trunk

Louis Vuitton’s relationship with the world of art began in 1924 when art dealer Rene’ Gimpel ordered a trunk for his business trips to New York, Paris and London. To meet the needs of artists like Rene, Louis Vuitton created larger trunks with drawers that could protect the artwork during travel. Returning to the companies roots of protective packaging caught the eye of the art world and soon other artists became customers as well. Masters of the art world such as the artist Matisse became clients of Louis Vuitton. Many artists developed close ties to the company and were given the opportunity to design one of a kind trunks. Over the years these ” artists in residence” have created new fabrics, patterns and designs for the house of Louis Vuitton. Louis Vuitton’s most recent collaboration has been with the artists Jeff Koons whose collection includes recreations of master works.

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Curio Trunks

During the 1900’s Gaston-Louis started buying trunks from previous customers to create his trunk collection. To start this process he would send certain customers a questionnaire to learn more about their trunks. Next the customers that returned the questionnaire, were sent an offer by Gaston to buy their trunks. The trunks in The Curio Trunks room consists of the trunks Gaston bought to create his collection.

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The Beauty of Fashion

Trunks for Stars

During the 1920’s and 1930’s the house of Louis Vuitton stepped beyond the trunk and started making beauty items, furniture pieces and specialty items. Hollywood’s starlets ordered velvet lined trunks along with the various new pieces the house was creating. Specialty pieces that were made for stars include a vanity case for Sharon Stone, wardrobe trunk for Katharine Hepburn and a suitcase and vanity set for Elizabeth Taylor. Stars around the globe continue to order from the house to help them with their travel and everyday needs.

 

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Exquisite Bottles

It was in 1927 that Gaston-Louis Vuitton created the first fragrance for Louis Vuitton, in an effort to expand the fields in which Louis Vuitton played. He cared just as much for the look of the bottle as he did the fragrance itself. Being so each time the house created a new fragrance Gaston would commission masters in the decorative arts field to design the bottles. The collaborations became a tradition for the house with its latest being in 2016 with designer Marc Newson.

 

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Sophisticated Dandies

Not only were silver screen actresses customers of Louis Vuitton, but so were actors. Many of the first were French actors that ordered foot and wardrobe trunks. The actors also ordered garment bangs and toiletry bags that helped push the brand into the menswear arena. In the 1920’s the making of canes with carved heads was another collaboration opportunity for the house and different artists to create unique pieces.

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Collaborations

Besides artists the house has collaborated with individual designers over the years. The introduction of different designers to Louis Vuitton began in 1996 when Azzedine Alana, Manolo Blahnik, Romeo Gigli, Helmut Lang, Isaac Mizrahi, Sybilla and Viviene Westwood were invited to collaborate with the house. This event helped mark Louis Vuitton’s one-hundredth anniversary. In 1997 Louis Vuitton officially entered the  fashion sphere with a ready-to-wear line. Guiding this new avenue for the brand was Marc Jacobs, the artistic director of the ready- to-wear line for almost 16 years. Jacobs used many of the artistic collaborations as inspirations for his collections. The designers that took on the role as Artistic Director after Jacobs departure also used artists and authors to create unique collections.

 

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The Music Room

Other than making trunks for clothing, art and writing the house of Louis Vuitton has been known to make trunks for musical artists as well. Delicate musical instruments have been stored in these special order trunks. Violins, guitars and more have found a safe haven for travel with Louis Vuitton.

Louis Vuitton

 

Louis Vuitton Loves America

In 1893 Georges Vuitton made his first step into the U.S market when he attended the Chicago World’s Fair. While there he met John Wanamaker, owner of the first ever department stores. A few years later in 1898 Wanamaker put Louis Vuitton in his New York and Philadelphia stores. By the roaring 20’s Louis Vuitton had become the luxury luggage of choice for people all over the country.

Fast forward to 1997 to one of the most memorable Louis Vuitton eras which is when Marc Jacobs became Artistic Director. The designer guided the brand into the new millennium and held the position as Artistic Director for 16 years. During this time he made iconic collaborations with various artists including Yayoi Kusama who introduced her signature polka dot and Stephen Spouse who created graffiti inspired designs. Currently guiding the Louis Vuitton brand through each season is Nicolas Ghesquiere whose dressed celebrities like Taylor Swift and Nicole Kidman among others.

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Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton by Nicolas Ghesquiere worn by Riley Keogh at the 2014 Amfar Ceremony

 

Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton by Nicolas Ghesquiere 2017 worn by Ruth Negga for the Golden Globes

Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton by Nicolas Ghesquiere 2017 worn by Michelle Williams

Louis Vuitton

Nicolas Ghesquiere for Louis Vuitton worn by Taylor Swift at the 2016 Met Gala.

Louis Vuitton

Nicolas Ghesquiere for Louis Vuitton worn by Jennifer Connelly at the 2017 Met Ball.

 

Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton by Marc Jacobs and artist Stephen Spouse printed roses skirt.

Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton by Marc Jacobs, feather headpiece and mink short dress and graffiti legging.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louis Vuitton

Marc Jacobs for Louis Vuitton. Worn by Madonna at the 2009 Met Ball.

 

I hope you get to see this amazing and encompassing exhibition. If you don’t I hope you’ve enjoyed my reviews. I learned so many interesting facts of a brand that I’ve worked for in the past, but had no idea of!

The Louis Vuitton Volez, Voguez, Voyagez exhibition will be on display at the New York Stock Exchange building on 86th Trinity Place in the financial district until January 7th 2018.

T.S.

fashion Fashion exhibit History Uncategorized

The Louis Vuitton Exhibition: Rooms 1-5

Louis Vuitton

 

The Louis Vuitton Volez, Voguez, Vayagez (Fly, Sail, Travel) exhibition has made its way around the globe. Originating in Paris, the brands birthplace the presentation has finally made its way to New York City after much anticipation. Both Paris and Tokyo viewers of the exhbition have given rave reviews of this immersive exhibition. And it is no wonder why when each room of the Louis Vuitton exhibition was curated to not only showcase the immersive Louis Vuitton history from past to present, but honor the city in which it is held. The original stock exchange building where the exhibition is housed is a New York City institution and is magnificent on its own. As you make you way into each room you are transported to the past, with each interiorly transformed to represent Louis Vuitton’s history. The exhibition has an accompanying app that gives you an interactive experience, so be sure to download that first!

 

History of Louis Vuitton the Man

At the age of 14 Louis Vuitton left his village in Eastern France on foot and made his way to Paris two years later. As a young man he apprenticed as a box maker and packer for the box manufacturer Romaine Marechal. By 1854 he founded the company of Louis Vuitton on rue Nerve-des-Capucines which became  one of Paris’s most famous shopping boulevards. His lightweight yet strong designs became a hit amongst high society. Louis is credited in perfecting the flat trunk, the first step towards modern luggage. By 1875 he created the wardrobe trunk which allowed the traveler to hang their clothes in the luggage. This invention skyrocketed the already booming company.

Louis Vuitton

 

Part 1-The Trunk of 1906

In 1896 Louis Vuitton’s son Georges created the “LV” monogram which the house is known for. In 1906 the monogram was added to the trunk for the first time by Gaston-Louis Vuitton, grandson of Louis Vuitton. 1906 was also the first time the trunk was designed with their signature brass corners with a patent lock added for security.

Louis Vuitton

Part 2-Wood

Woodwork was Louis’s first craftsmanship. As a young boy who grew up near a forest wood was always influential for him. As a box maker he also worked with wood, so it was second nature for Louis to create his own trunks out of wood. In particular he used camphor wood to detour pests, poplar wood for the frame and beech wood for reinforcement. Lastly he would use rosewood for its aromatic scent.

 

Louis Vuitton

Left: Interior luggage labels of the 1800’s.
Top Right: Advertising card of 1885.
Bottom Right: Mailing envelope for the LV stores of Paris and London 1890.

Louis Vuitton

 

Part 3-Classic Trunks

The linage of trunks begins with the Trainon Grey in 1854. The Striped Canvas trunk came next in 1872 which came in the colors red, brown and later in the combination of beige and brown. 1888 introduced the Damier canvas trunk and soon the flat trunk was invented. The house continued to build their reputation for trunks and cemented their reliability with the Ideale trunk, with the purpose of keeping items safe  during travel.

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Part 4-The Invention of Travel

Louis Vuitton was the luggage of choice for explorer and engineer André-Gustave Citroën during the excursions of the 1924 and 1925. The House of Louis Vuitton created particular trunks that could withstand the hot climate, different types of transportation and accommodate the portable comforts needed for explorers like Citroën.

 

During the rise of yachting the house of Louis Vuitton created the Steamer Bag, which modernized the hand luggage spectrum. The bag had the ability to be folded into any wardrobe trunk compartment. The bags weight, size and ease is considered to be the blueprint for the modern day gym bag.

Steamer Trunk on the right.

 

 

During the automobile rise the Vuittonite or Monogram canvas wardrobe and hat trunks were the some of Louis Vuitton’s most popular trunks. Picnic trunks, coolers and flat Morocco leather bag, the precursor to the handbag were in high demand as well.

 

Chauffeur’s Kit in Vuittonite Canvas 1910

 

 

 

The invention of airplanes led the house of Louis Vuitton to meet the needs of aviators and travelers alike. The Aero trunk, the grandfather of the carry-on luggage was the answer for people needing compact and lightweight luggage.

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Advancements in train travel gave the house the chance to create the Cabin trunk. This new trunk could fit under seats, while other bags such as garment and overnight bags also became in demand models.

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Part 5-Writing

Gaston-Louis Vuitton was an appreciator of writing and books. He himself was an author so its no wonder that the house of Louis Vuitton created mobile offices and various trunks that suited traveling writers.

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The Louis Vuitton Volez, Voguez, Voyagez exhibition will be open until January 7, 2018 on 86 Trinity Place in the financial district. I will have a follow up post covering rooms 6-10 soon. Have you seen the exhibition or are you looking forward to seeing it? Let me know your comments and thoughts here and on social media!

T.S.

 

 

 

 

 

fashion Lifestyle shoes Uncategorized

4 Ways to style Who What Wear’s bell sleeve top from Target

who what wear

Like every other person I’m obsessed with Target. I am particularly obsessed with their affordable fashion. Namely the Who What Wear collection, which by far is my favorite clothing line there. Although the new line A New Day is has some great work wear that I might be buying soon. Who What Wear at Target is  great for the office but I love the more casual pieces as well. I own a few pieces from previous collections and some like a black bomber have become staples.

On a recent trip in which Target was having (still is) a huge sale on clothes I exited Target with the grey lace bell sleeve ribbed crewneck top. Its important to note that I am not a huge fan of turtlenecks and hardly wear them so a crewneck is more up my alley. If you don’t like the feeling of a turtleneck go for the shorter crewneck, which has a less restrictive feel.

The top originally cost $27.99 but is on sale now for $19.59. What a steal! The top keeps me quite warm because the rib knit has a medium thickness to it. If the top didn’t have a good weight to it I might not have gotten it. But Who What Wear got it right in both the purpose of rib knit (durability and warmth) and style. I’ve worn the top for an ootd (outfit of the day) post on Instagram and many of you loved the top. So I figured I’d show you a few ways I’ve styled it.

Casual

who what wear

Top: Who What Wear
Jeans: H&M
Boots: Call IT Spring
Sunglasses: Mulberry & Grand
Hat: Target

 

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Formal

who what wear

Top: Who What Wear for Target
Skirt: Five on Seven New York
Shoes: Atmosphere from Primark

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Semi Casual

who what wear

Top: Who What Wear, Jogger Formal Pant: The Loft, Shoes: Christian Siriano for Payless

 

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Formal ( If you follow me on Instagram you’ve seen this one!)

who what wear

Top: Who What Wear for Target
Skirt: Who What Wear for Target
Purse: Target
Shoes: Brash for Payless

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How would you style this top? Did you like any one outfit in particular? Let me know in the comments and on social media. For outfit posts follow me on Instagram!

T.S.

fashion

Top 17 Fashion Documentaries to Watch On Netflix Now!

fashion documentaries

It’s probably not surprising to learn that I like to watch fashion documentaries. Like any other documentary its interesting to watch how other people go through their lives. For me in particular I love seeing how other people in my field have succeeded. Most of the time stumbling and failing until they become the household names they are today. I also love history and if you read my fashion exhibition posts you’ll know I love fashion history in particular. Essentially that’s what a documentary is, isn’t? A look into the history of a person and their accomplishments, failures and in this case their imprint into the world of fashion.

 

Iris

This documentary follows 90 something fashion legend Iris Apfel and her husband Carl. The outspoken and fashion risk taker talks about her life, businesses and her take on fashion. Her mothers love of accessories was passed down to her, as you might notice by the endless amount of necklaces and bracelets she combines in one outfit. Both educational and sentimental the documentary shows how she combines art fashion and art into her life and career. It also shows how Iris and Carl have succeeded in their marriage since 1948. Iris’s background in interior design can be seen in the bold patterns she wears. Iris and Carls textiles company Old World Weavers is still a highly respected company today. A spitfire until this day her quick-witted humor and out of the box fashion will enthrall you.

fashion documentaires

 

 

Franca: Chaos and Creation

Follow the late Editor in Chief of Vogue Italia as her son asks her both personal and industry related inquires. Franca Sozzani edited her magazine completey opposite to that of American Vogue Editor and Chief Anna Wintour. Photoshoots representing econominical, societal, environmental and at times extremely sexual situations became the norm for Vogue Italia. Franca believed that Vogue should speak on all aspects of life and especially the problems that needed to be spotlighted. For example after the BP oil spill of 2010 Franca organized a photo shoot showcasing models washed up on a beach covered in oil, representing the sea life destroyed by the event.

Unlike other fashion magazines Vogue Italia is often criticized and considered controversial because of the style of graphic photography highlighting social issues along side the latest fashion. The documentary not only shows the creation of Vogue Italia but the relationship between Franca and her son. Like most parents and their grown children the love, growth, understanding and mutual humor is showcased in this touching movie.

fashion documentaries

 

 

Women He’s Undressed

A documentary about costume designer Orry-Kelly. Kelly was the rockstar of costumes in Hollywood for decades. Part sartorial reenactment and interview reality this documentary is both humorous and educational. Kelly was a jack of all trades trying to make money in his early years in New York City. Not long after he was dressing Katherine Hepburn and Ethel Barrymore. After a run in with the mob, Kelly left New York for Los Angeles. Los Angeles was a success for him where he worked for Warner Brothers making costumes for movies like Casa Blanca and many more blockbusters.

fashion documentaries

 

Dior And I

Watch Dior’s previous Artistic Director Ralf Simons navigate the waters of the Haute Couture world as he creates his first collection for the iconic house.

fashion documentaries

 

The First Monday in May

In the fashion universe The First Monday in May is the day of the Met Gala. The event is spearheaded by Vogue Editor in Chief Ana Wintour and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It showcases the collaborative process of creating the exhibition which always correlates with the theme of the gala. How Ana Wintour chooses who will be invited and where they will sit is also fascinating to watch.

fashion documentaries

 

Inside British Vogue

Go inside the pages of British Vogue with this documentary. Watch how photo shoots and runway shows get created and completed across the pond. And of course the drama of rivalries and competitions that are can occur in the industry.

fashion documentaries

 

Jeremy Scott the People’s Designer

Get a biographical look into the life of Moschino designer Jeremy Scott. The creator of the teddy bear, neon colored forks coming down the latest Moschino runway. His humble beginnings for the Missouri native are a far cry from the celebrities he dresses now like Katy Perry.

fashion documentaries

 

Fresh Dressed

The rise of hip hop fashion and its influence on the fashion world.

fashion documentaries

 

Blue Gold American Jeans

If you’re a vintage enthusiast this ones for you. Watch jean hunter Eric Schrader globe trot as he discovers rare jeans and how they became such a staple in fashion and everyday life.

 

fashion documentaries

 

Casablancas The Man Who Loved Women

Learn how the top modeling agency Elite Models came to be with this biography of founder John Casablancas. The man known for creating supermodels.

fashion documentaries

 

Cut From a Different Cloth

In this surprising documentary watch how creators of the brand Superdry and actor Idris Elba collaborate to create a clothing line.

fasgion documentaries

Sneakerheadz

Its what it sounds like! The sneaker version of MTV Cribs, sneaker lovers showing off their prized kicks.

fashion documentaires

In Louboutin’s Shoes

Peek into the world of designer Christian Louboutin and his transition into the Asian market of luxury shoes.

 

fashion documentaires

Yves Saint Laurent

Not a documentary but equally as interesting learn about the at times tumultuous life and career of Yves Saint Laurent.

 

fashion documentaires

 

Mexico Disena

If you watch Project Runway this is for you. Mexico Disena is the Mexican version, showcasing 11 contestants battling for the final fitting.

 

fashion documentairies

Abstract

A look into different types of designers and their creative process. From automotive designers to footwear designers plus six other creative fields are showcased.

fashion documentaires

 

The Women’s List

This documentary interviews successful women who have conquered all different kinds of professional fields. Creator of Spanx Sara Blakely talks about how a she took a chance that paid off tens times over.

fashion documentaires

Have you watched any of these? What are your thoughts? Let me know in the comments and on social media.

T.S.