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Accessories art Beauty fashion Fashion exhibit Jewlery shoes The Museum at FIT

FIT’s School of Art and Design Graduating Exhibition

FIT Museum

Recently on display at the Museum at FIT was the work and thesis projects of the graduating class of 2017. Many know FIT is a prestigious school for fashion, but it also teaches many of the arts. The exhibition showcased students work from all sixteen major areas of study. The exhibition was showcased in various areas of the museum and the school itself.

Accessories Design

For their final steps to achieving their degree’s students were instructed to create a collection around the concept of  ” Design Perspective”. Each took on a different interpretation to create their collections. Students used research on consumers, seasons, and inspirations to bring them to life. They created pieces belonging to either footwear, handbags, millinery (hats), or art. Every piece exhibited was judged and selected by FIT staff and fashion industry critics.

 

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Advertising Design

The students of advertising design were to creating content that reaches today’s public. Not only do these final projects advertise a product , they become one with the consumer. The students created experiences, much like we are used to today. To bring out an emotion or thought, not simply an agreement to buy. The advertisements  reflect much of what is currently happening and resonates with exhibition viewers.

Museum at FIT Museum at FIT

Computer Animation and Interactive Media

Graduates from the computer animation and interactive media program also focused on engaging with the viewer. They created apps, games,  environments and more that integrated their knowledge of technology design. This particular class used many personal experiences and social causes in their work. Race, sexuality, religion and how they felt about these topics came across in these pieces.

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Fabric Styling

The class in fabric styling forecasted the color story of Summer/ Spring 2018. Through market research, trend forecasting and four colors they showcased the latest in women’s wear and home décor. Much of the public does not realize how ahead of time forecasters like these students are. Their work is continually a year ahead of its time.

Fashion Design

Fashion Design students used their expertise with fashion design art, CAD, journaling, and art portfolio to create their final designs. Their work was critiqued and selected by industry critics, guest designers and professors who mentored these students. On the judging day the selecteded looks were included in the BFA Future of Fashion runway show. Once the looks were selected the students work with experienced models for their final fittings. Students in the individual categories of Children’s Wear, Intimate Apparel, Knitwear, Special Occasion and Sportswear showcased their looks in the fashion show. Through these steps the students’ personal take on fashion design evolved and prepared them for their careers.

FIT Museum Museum at FIT Museum at FIT

 

Fine Arts

Fine Arts graduates were tasked with answering the question “How does a young artist create work that is relevant in our  contemporary culture?” Their work answered this question by adding their personal experience’s and identity to demonstrate advertising, consumerism, environmental issues, and social media. The proximity to multiple museums in NYC helped them cultivate their thoughts and creative process. They are now able to create fine art relevant to the ever changing society.

 

Museum at FIT

 

Graphic Design

Graphic design students were to write their thesis exploring the past, present and future on the topic they chose. Through the use of graphic media the students expressed their thoughts. With the images and words they selected they offered a fresh perspective on what’s occurring in today’s society. All the work displayed was critiqued by professionals in graphic design.

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Illustration

Students of the illustration program used their traditional and digital art media experience to creatively problem solve. The issue being how to create images for commercial distribution that targets specific audiences. Through their personal style, technique, expression and body of work cultivated at FIT they were able to solve the issue.

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Interior Design

The class of interior design took their education in problem solving, space planning  and research to create their own perspectives. Their perspectives and the issues of sustainability, culture and constructions helped them create their thesis. The objective was to create interiors that looked great and spoke to the viewers. Unlike other students Interior design students created their final projects with aesthetic, functional and program constraints. To work around these limitations they used materials, colors and furnishings to create their interior design stories.

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Jewelry Design

Jewelry Design graduates created jewelry with design, craft, economics and ethics in mind. They also thought of sustainability and social responsibility when creating their pieces. They used both modern and ancient techniques to create their jewelry. Their work is to be viewed as both jewelry and individual works of art.

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Menswear

The menswear graduating class created their final thesis much like a tailor makes suits.  They showcased their designs in their portfolios to their class during a presentation. Next they created their muslin, a plain white fabric designers use to create the base of their designs. Once their muslins were criticized and reworked they began the final process. Finished fabrics and tailoring techniques were then used to create their final menswear pieces. Finally their work was critiqued by well known menswear designers and put on display. Past graduating classes have been critiqued by John Varvatos, Italo Zucchelli for Calvin Klein and John Bartlett.

 

 

Packing Design

The students of the packing design program worked to advance the principals wing branding and packing design. They used innovative techniques to reach the consumers of food, beverage and home products. They also created designs to speak to packing designs to reach the consumers of beauty, personal care and technology products. They were tasked to create the designs within the constraints of conceptual development, graphic execution, production and compliance requirements.  They also took into account marketing and what would be their competition.

Museum at FIT Museum at FIT

Photography

Students of the graduating photography class expressed political views, fashion trends, and emotions. They also used documentary photography and  their personal experiences with family and their childhood to inspire their final captures.Their photography much like those of regarded professional photographers have the ability to impact the societal culture of the present and future.

FIT museum

Textile/Surface Design

Textile/Surface Design students created textiles of painted, woven, and screen printed techniques. They implemented classical forms of textile creation with innovative new technologies. They created their own aesthetics within the requirements of the textile industry. Their final pieces showcase the students ability to create new textiles that are creative, full of required techniques and its ability to be  marketable.

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Toy Design

The class of Toy Design uses imagination to help develop kids self -image. Students created toys that help create a healthy lifestyle of play. Their toys also challenge critical thinking in the child who plays with them. Students incorporated community issues, culture, nature into their interactive children’s games. The toys ranged from stuffed animals, board games, digital worlds and more.

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Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design

The Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design program focuses on the ability create environments that inspire, inform and persuade the viewer. Students created life size mock ups of events such as a retail space, display, museum exhibition, event or individual place. The students process included the design process and market analysis with the help of industry experts. Their designs were reviewed in an exhibition and finally developed digitally and physically.

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It was immensely interesting to see what the future of the creative fields have in store. There is no shortage of creativity with students like these and the colleges that mold them into productive creators. As I walked through the exhibition I was not only learning about these creative majors but remembering my own time in college. There are more details and hours that go into the final product of a creative industry than consumers and viewers realize.

T.S.

art fashion Fashion exhibit History Lifestyle The Museum at FIT Uncategorized

The Museum at FIT’s Adrian: Hollywood And Beyond

Last month at the Museum at FIT along with the two other exhibitions I covered, Adrian : Hollywood and Beyond was on display. Known originally for his costume creations  at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer,  Gilbert Adrian went on to create his own fashion line. During his career as a costume designer he created costumes for over 250 films, dressing stars like Katharine Hepburn and Joan Crawford. Many of the films were blockbusters whose costumes inspired ready to wear designs. Stores like Macy’s  opened “cinema shops” that showcased outfits inspired by these costumes. Throughout the exhibition you see the respect Adrian had for the art of fashion, fabric and all the details needed to create memorable pieces.  The relationships he had with textile manufacturers allowed him to create some of his most “awed at” pieces. A glossary guide provided by the museum helped all who saw the exhibition  understand the intricate techniques Adrian used in his costumes and fashion line. If you are an retro movie lover like I am, you will recognize some of the costumes and movies as well.

When Adrian opened his first fashion boutique in 1942 in Beverley Hills his clients were not movie stars, but the everyday American woman. Adrian’s time as a costume designer led him to understand prints and how to cut and sew them to their full potential. For the movie the Wizard of OZ his understanding of patterns and how they stood out on a black and white film led him to make memorable costumes. Dorothy was purposefully outfitted in the blue and white gingham (check) dress that popped in the black and white film and in Technicolor.

Gilbert Adrian

Applique’: A new design created when a small piece of fabric or contrasting material is applied to the original fabric. Cuts are attached through stitching the edges to the original fabric.

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In this gown Adrian allowed the print to be the focal point. He used Draping and Applique to create the shoulders shadow effect.

fashion at the museum at FIT

Adrian used draping for the back of this dress.

Fashion at the Muesum at FIT

Adrian original evening dress 1947. Print designed by Salvador Dali for Wesley Simpson, Inc. Textile by American Enka Corporation.

 

 

Bias: When fabric is cut on a bias or at a 45 degree angle instead of the straight (Parallel)or cross-grain (perpendicular) the fabric has more elasticity. This elasticity allows the fabric to drape easier.

HOLLYWOOD FASHION

Adrian Original wool suit jacket 1950. In this jacket Adrian used inset strips of bias cut fabric. This intricately sewn garment includes pockets constructed of six separate pieces.

 

 

Design Repeat: An aspect of all patterned fabrics. Design repeat refers to the distance between where the pattern starts, repeats and begin again. Sometimes hard to distinguish in certain patterns.

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1944 Time and Country ad. Adrian collaborated with Bianchini- Ferrier a French textile mill in NYC. Adrian not only created the dress but helped create the design repeat print on the dress.

museum at FIT

An example of a collaboration and print Adrian used.
Bianchini-Ferier, Inc Warp-Printed silk taffeta, circa 1949 and printed rayon circa 1949.

Adrian fashion

On the right you see that Adrian chose the print in silk taffeta to make an evening gown that was featured in Vogue 1949.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draping: A form of constructing garments. Fabric is placed directly on the form or model, the designer then begins folding and pinning parts of the fabric to create the desired form. The fabric can be removed to create a pattern of the draped fabric or left draped as the final result.

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Adrian Custom couture evening dress silk jersey 1942. Adrian used silk jersey in both his costumes and fashion line. For this dress he draped a single width of jersey on the bias. The bias created the front drape while the rest of the fabric falls over the shoulder.

For this costume worn in the 1952 movie “Lovely to Look At” Adrian manipulated the silk jersey. The pleating he created allowed the textile to stretch and create a hood and sleeves.

 

 

Inset: A design similar to applique’. A small shape is cut out of a larger piece of fabric, where another textile is cut and sewn into the cutout, filling that space. The purpose of the inset can be functional or decorative. The inset can help with fit or create an interesting pattern. The inset can be the same pattern as the base fabric or entirely different.

HOLLYWOOD FASHION

Adrian Original wool suit jacket 1950. In this jacket Adrian used inset strips of bias cut fabric. This intricately sewn garment includes pockets constructed of six separate pieces. The insets include the strips on the upper chest bodice and pockets.

Mitering: When two pieces are gathered diagonally, preferably at a corner. This manipulation of the fabric allows crisp corners in garments. Mitering is also used to create dramatic prints.

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Adrian original Day Dress 1943. The mitered stripes create a chevron pattern. Adrian’s construction narrows at the waist and widens at the shoulders. This was the trend of the moment.

 

Fashion

 

Piecing: Much like solving a puzzle, in piecing different shaped pieces of fabric are sewn together forming one fabric. It involves measuring and cutting each piece of fabric so they fit perfectly into each other.

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Piecing: Adrian Original Rayon Crepe 1945

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For this three piece ensemble Adrian pieced together shapes like a puzzle to create the illusion of a print. Many of these creations were inspired by art work by Picasso and were named after artists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screenprinting: A technique that creates prints on fabric. This multistep process includes covering and protecting the parts of fabric not meant to receive the print. Then a mesh screen is placed on top of the fabric and the first color is applied. The colored ink is pushed through the screen onto the fabric. The fabric is dried and the process is repeated until the final print desired is created.

Adrian Original Two Piece evening ensemble 1944. This print distracts from the couture techniques. Adrian manipulated the fabric.

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Adrian Original Printed Rayon crepe circa 1947. Adrian added dramatic swags at the sleeves and skirts. The print is of classic theater scenes.

Screenprint can also be seen in the evening dress above under the term applique’. The screenprint was designed by Salvador Dali for the Wesley Simpson, Inc.

 

Tailoring: A form of construction used to make suits and garments with structure. This technique is used to design suits and jackets. The designer uses a mannequin to pin, stitch , mark and trim fabric creating a template. The template is traced on paper creating the pattern needed to create a garment.

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Mittered Stripes

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Middle Ensemble: Adrian Original suit 1945. Textile by Pola Strout Wool circa 1945. This suit appeared in Vogue and was part of Woman’s everyday look. The stripes are mitered and the textile is pieced together.

Textile Converter:  Textile conversion companies create masters of textiles. The masters are suitable for weaving and printing at textile mills. The design masters are original creations or replicas of artists like Dali that are printed on plain unfinished fabric known as “griege”. The fabric can then be manipulated or altered in  any form a designer wishes.

Fashion at the Muesum at FIT

Adrian original evening dress 1947. Print designed by Salvador Dali for Wesley Simpson, Inca. Textile conversion by American Enka Corporation.

Textile Design: The image, color, texture or design that is on a textile. Textile designs are created through printing or weaving. Stripes, plaid and ikat are all forms of textile design. Textile design fabric can then be finished with dyeing, printing, embroidery, beading and applique’.

 

fashion at FIT

fashion

Adrian Original circa 1951. Adrian placed the fabric at right angles so that the stripes of the silk mousseline would be visible. The silk also adds volume, a trend of the 1950’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Textile Regulation: During WWII materials like fabric were needed for military  supplies. In 1942 the War Production Board imposed Regulation L-85. This imposed restrictions on the use of cotton, silk, nylon, wool, leather and rubber for anything other than parachutes, uniforms and other supplies. Designers also had restrictions on the amount of material they could use. To keep up with the newest trends, designers became resourceful through shortening lengths and narrowing cuts.

This print distracts from the couture techniques. Adrian manipulated the fabric. As the dress was made in 1944, it was during a time of textile regulation.

 

Adrian’s costume’s in the movies  1938 “Sweethearts” , 1939 “The Women”, and  1952 “Lovely to Look At”.

As I walked through this exhibition I felt like I was back in my textile class in college. One of my favorite classes, as the creating of fabric and what you can make with one length of it is endless. As Adrian showed in his costumes and collections, with respect and knowledge for fabric and its creators there are endless creative possibilities in fashion.

T.S.

fashion

Exhibitionism: The Rolling Stones at Industria NYC

Currently on display at Industria in the West Village is the exhibit  Exhibitionism: The Rolling Stones. An exhibit you might think only a rock and roll aficionado might love. When in reality even as a person who didn’t know much about the Rolling Stones I appreciated the history, creativity, art and most of all fashion showcased in the exhibit. Two floors cover the  history of the band from conception to a 3D concert where the band plays some of its famous hits. Devotion vodka the official vodka of The Sugar Factory held a great dinner at the restaurant where the drinks paid homage to The Rolling Stones with names like Sugar and Stones. After which the dinner guests were escorted from The Sugar Factory to Industria to view the exhibition.

    Devotion Vodka

Devotion Vodka Rolling Stones

Sugar and Stones made with Devotion Black and Blue Blackberry and Blueberry Vodka

There were so many interesting facts to learn and artifacts to view although I found the following particularly interesting. A mock up studio with an array of different instruments and original records are on display. Original guitars, drums, cassette tapes, some of which were designed by various artists showcase how the band used their creativity in all aspects while making music. A mock up of their original flat or apartment adds to the belief that rock bands although creative geniuses, tidy and clean they are not.

Rolling Stonse apsrtment Rolling Stones Museum

 

Rolling Stones

Mock Up of their                                                    apartment

Studio Mockup

An extensive history of the bands logo was the next section of the exhibition that I loved. The iconic mouth with a tongue sticking out has stood the test of time. Even if you are not a Rolling Stones follower you’ve seen it everywhere. The original conception began after Mick Jagger found a picture of the Hindu goddess Kali which has a tongue sticking out. After Mick brought the picture to British artist John Pasche he came up with the logo that is known today. Many people think the logo is inspired by Mick Jagger’s voluminous mouth although it’s not directly the source the artist believes it was an unconscious inspiration. It’s universal appeal is its rebellious, anti-conventional and anti-authority nature.

 

 

 

Art and design also helped define the rock groups aesthetic. The creation of album covers and promotional posters was a chance for the band to collaborate with artists, graphic designers and photographers. Their collaborations with Andy Warhol helped grow the popularity of pop art in their era. While their collaborations with fashion designers and how they wore their stage costumes and clothing set the trends of the time. Costumes made by the late Gianni Versace and Alexander McQueen were part of their eccentric wardrobe. While Prada and Marc Jacobs are also some of the many well known brands that have designed costumes for the band.

 

 

The Backstage Access portion of the exhibition includes a mock up room of what the bands surroundings were while they waited to preform. Many times whether performing  in an amphitheater or smaller venue their backstage environment was a small room that served as the bands rehearsal space and much more. Make shift dressing rooms, workshops and offices were created to help the band prepare for a concert. This was also the place were loved ones could hang out and where personal items were held. The  backstage room helped the band feel a sense of comfort while away from home.

Ronnie’s rehearsal notes

 

In the final room of the exhibition you are treated to a pre-recorded 3D concert experience. The band plays “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and you are emerged with the audience as Mick Jagger and the rest of the band perform.  If you are a rock genre lover and especially a fan of the Rolling Stones you must go see this extensive exhibition.  As a person who didn’t know much about the band but who appreciates art in all forms I enjoyed the creative details on display. Their creativity and ability to push the boundaries of art, fashion and societal norms is what I found most impressive. The exhibition is open until Sunday, March 12th. “Exhibitionism” is located at Industria on 775 Washington St, NY, NY.

T.S.