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New Shoes!

shoes booties, fall fashion

I’m pretty sure I’ve spoken about this before but I have a very small foot. Size five in fact! Yes that’s right FIVE! And a size three in children shoes! Yes I know you’re giggling now, but think of the price difference. Not laughing now right? When I find a pair of shoes that are my size I usually always buy them on the spot, no matter the price. Most stores don’t carry my size or carry a very limited quantity, so I am 99% sure I won’t see them again anytime soon. Yesterday during an evening trip to the mall I was looking for an inexpensive pair of flats. Ask anyone that spends a lot of time in NYC, flats are your best friend! A new pair are a bit overdue, so I was in search of a new pair. I didn’t find what I was looking for because my go to for my small foot (Payless) didn’t have anything! Don’t think Payless has fashionable options? Think again! Its not the Payless of yesteryear, and thanks to their Christian Siriano collaboration more fashionable than ever! Again small feet don’t give you a chance to discriminate anyway! Plus if you are a true fashion lover you can style a $10 anything and make it look like $1000 bucks. After an unsuccessful trip to Payless I checked out Call It Spring. I hit the shoe jackpot and bought 2 pairs of shoes!

New Booties!

I really needed a pair of bottles without a heel! The booties I currently have (fashion week pics) are super cute but killers on my feet at the end of the day! So I was so glad when I found a block heel moto inspired pair at Call It Spring. I was also shocked that they had shoes in my size, as in the past this has not always been the case.The Nunalla booties was exactly what I was looking for. Its definitely comfortable due to the block heel that gives my short stature a lift without a steep angle. I practically like the metal accent detail on the heel that elevates the all black look. It also has a mix of textures that is subtle. They are basically the perfect pair of boots made for walking! The Nunalla was originally $74.99 but I paid $22.50 thanks to the current sale!

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New flats!

To my surprise Call it Spring was also where I found a pair of flats. I couldn’t find a super causal pair, but came across a semi-casual pair of flats. At first I thought they were too formal but thanks to my shopping partner in crime (mother) saw the possibilities. The small heel is covered in sequins giving it a festive feel for a semi-casual event. The satin like fabric is perfect for after work events. While a bow pulls the timeless style shoe together. These are a pair that I won’t being wearing every single day but they are definitely going to be useful. I’m still looking for a new pair that can take on the everyday work of the NYC streets. The Desarro was originally $39.99 but thanks to the current sale they were $29.98. Classic and sparkly!

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I’m always in a happy place when I buy new shoes, no matter the price! Do you have a hard time finding shoes like I do? If you do, wear do you find your shoes?!

T.S.

 

 

Career Event fashion Life Lifestyle shoes Travel Uncategorized

Working a Tradeshow

Childrens Club Fashion

For the past few months I worked for Children’s Club, the leading tradeshow for children’s fashion in NY and Vegas. I’ve done so in the past and have written a post about what it is like to attend a show and the brands that were there. Read about that here! As part of a new section of my blog I will start writing about what it is like to work in the fashion industry. Today I will be talking about what it is like to prepare for and set up a tradeshow.

Before a tradeshow occurs there are months of preparation for an event that is only three days long. For every tradeshow there is a team behind it who guides every company that wishes to exhibit at the tradeshow. During my time working for Children’s Club my responsibilities include inputting contracts, chasing money and selecting pictures sent to us by the brands. These pictures would be put on social media, a slide show shown during the show and in the brand book that’s given out at the show. I also was in charge of interacting with the brands on Instagram.

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The process of brands selecting a booth starts with the contract. Each brand is given a contract which gives them options on what type of booth they want, where they want to be located and who they don’t or do want to be located near. And lastly they have to sign the contract, something believe it or not some brands forget to do. Once this first step is taken a tradeshow manager or I can input the contract into the system which officially puts the brand into the tradeshow. After I’ve put in contracts and helped double-check all of them, it’s time to chase down money from brands who have yet to pay the full price of their booth.

Once we’ve collected all the money owed it’s time to floor plan. Something I helped with occasionally, but that is predominantly done by the rest of the team. Booth size, type of booth and the brands’ wishes are all taken into account, although you can’t please everyone and some brands will complain about their positioning and price. There are also the brands who pull out of the show or try to, without realizing they sign a legally binding contract. There are some sad excuses given when the brand has to explain why they are breaking the contract. Although life happens and family or legal issues has forced brands to legitimately back out.

After months of this detailed preparation the show dates are upon us. It’s time for all the brands and teams from UBM Fashion to make their way to the Jacob Javits Convention Center to set up and attend the show. Set up days can be hectic and they are longggg.  They consists of most of the brands coming into the Javits all in one day and setting up the merchandise in their booths. At this point the actual booths are already up, and if the brand is satisfied with their booth they start to put in their merchandise. Operative word is IF, because most of the time set up day consist of all the UBM fashion crew (including me) being pulled in every which way with a million and one questions.

During these days my job predominantly consist of helping salesmen recheck that all of the more than 500 booths have the correct signage. I also help collect samples from all the brands that have the opportunity to showcase their merchandise on mannequins. These are place in the front of the tradeshow entrance. This is basically a free ad for these brands, a great opportunity for them. At the end of each day the mannequins are dressed with the samples I or a salesman collected. I had never changed a mannequin until I worked at UBM! Those things can be uncooperative but look adorable once all dressed and arranged into a group of coordinated outfits.

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Childrens Club Fashion

At the end of the day is when the mannequins for which I picked up samples for are dressed. I dressed the girl in the front with the striped top. Outfits are arranged as best as possible with what each brand gives us.

Childrens Club Fashion

Crates of merchandise are delivered, forklifts are being driven in every which way and carpet is yet to be laid. These days call for jeans, t-shirts and sneakers.

 

 

Finally the opening day of the tradeshow begins and the Javits is full of vendors, wholesale buyers, press, fashion professionals, UBM staff and tradeshow workers. Aside from the actual tradeshows occurring there are also side events. Special speakers like fashion legend Iris Apfel and Accessories magazine editors hosted talks and Q&A’s this year. Children’s Club always hosts a fashion show with Petite Parade. Basically toddlers to teens strutting their miniature stuff on a catwalk. The three-day tradeshows wrap up, with hopefully many orders filled and sales made. Almost immediately preparation begins for the Vegas tradeshows.

In my next post I will talk about what it is like to attend the Women’s tradeshows. I came across some awesome brands and can’t wait to tell you about them. Let me know if you are interested in more of these job post. As I am thinking of making it apart of my blog thanks to my ever-changing career.

To learn more about the UBM fashion tradeshows click here, here or here! 

Lastly since my post was a bit different this time around here are links to awesome fashion/travel blog posts from my great Instagram blogger group. All super stylish ladies!

Read about a trip to Poland! By Monica of Jersey Girl Texan Heart & great outfit posts by Yaudy Cristina here!

T.S.

Accessories fashion Fitness Life Lifestyle shoes Travel Uncategorized

Hilton Short Hills Travel and Lifestyle Event with TravelingMom

Hilton Short Hills

Getting away for the summer is always a treat. Whether it’s a month long vacation or a weekend, it’s great to find hotels that accommodate your every need.  The Hilton Short Hills, in Short Hills, NJ does this and more. I was invited to experience and learn about what this hotel has to offer by TravelingMom and She Buys Cars. The day was full of relaxation and travel education. With an ideal location close to NYC and across from Short Hills Mall there is plenty to see and do. The hotel offers shuttle service to the mall and has an on site rental car service. However there is no shortage of relaxing activities for adults to enjoy right in the Hilton Short Hills. While the whole family is bound to have fun as well.

Hilton Short Hills

Short Hills Hilton Lobby

 

If your looking for a relaxing and rejuvenating escape from the everyday hustle and bustle step into the Hilton’s spa. The Eforea Spa’s soothing atmosphere is sure to put you in a relaxed mood as it did me. With thirteen treatment rooms you’ll find something to relax and rejuvenate you. Whether you’re getting ready for a big event hosted at the hotel or simply want a mani or pedi, the salon is sure to take care of you. You and your spouse can  receive hair cuts, styling and waxing services. Looking forward to a massage instead? The Hilton Short Hills offers both single and couple massages. A private room ensures that you are at your most relaxed. Mommies to be can also enjoy prenatal massages and services.  After the massage make your way into the “Transition Room” to relax, drink and eat a healthy snack.

Hilton Short Hills Hilton Short Hills

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hilton Short Hills Hilton Short Hills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the gym is more your sanctuary look no further than their fitness center. Enjoy a class of Pilates or sweat it out in their state of the art gym. If you’re in the mood for a high intensity sport take a swing in their tennis court. Group lessons, cardio tennis and evening socials are available to guests. You can rent on site racquets if you’ve left yours at home. Not a tennis pro? The Hilton Short Hills offers private and hitting lessons to spruce up your skills. After a great work out and a shower why not take a dip in one of the hotels pools. The indoor pool’s relaxing and cool ambience is perfect for a lap. While the connected hot tub is perfect for warm relaxation. Their outdoor pool is great for sunbathing and swimming as well.

Hilton Short Hills

 

Conduct business meetings and summits in one of the hotels seven meeting suites. Plan your wedding or sweet 15/ 16 in the grand ballroom. The more intimate Pavilion with large windows is perfect for a small wedding. The Pavilion’s soft cascading white drapes add the perfect romantic and enchanted feel. The TravelingMom Travel and Lifestyle event was held in this relaxing room. Brands Ann Taylor, The Walking Company and Henri Bendal showcased there newest products here while a makeup artist was also on hand for refreshing touch up’s. These brands are just a few that can be found conveniently at the Short Hills Mall across from the hotel.

Hilton Short Hills

Ann Taylor

Hilton Short Hills

Hilton Short Hills

The Walking Company

Hilton Short Hills

Hilton Short Hills

Henri Bendel

 

 

We enjoyed a cooking demonstration of Scallop Avocado Toast with Peach Bourbon BBQ Sauce by the hotel’s Chef Richard Kennedy. I was excited to try this dish as I am a sea food enthusiast and it did not disappoint. A delicious salad previous to the seafood dish and an array of mini desserts completed this delectable meal. Chef Kennedy and the culinary team at the Hilton offer a live cooking and tasting series for guests. The delicious food prepared by Chef Kennedy is sustainably soured from local NJ farmers, a point in my book! Check out Chef Kennedy’s  Youtube Channel for great recipes.

Hilton Short Hills

Hilton Short Hills

Chef Richard Kennedy

Hilton Short Hills

Scallop Avocado Toast

 

Hilton Short Hills

 

As always the creators of She Buys Cars, Kim Orlando and Scotty Reiss were full of travel tips and tricks. Here are some of the tips I learned and plan to add them to my future trip planning.

  • The Chase Sapphire Reserve card is one of the best travel cards to have.
  • Feel free to call the hotel your staying in ahead of time for price matches and specials.
  • And check out apps like LuggageFree, Jet Setter, and Get My Boat for easier travel and planning.

Current trends in travel include:

  • Brewery hopping
  • Bleisure (Business and leisure in one trip)
  • Food tourism
  • Big weekend getaways
  • Responsible travel (economically, environmentally)

I so enjoyed my day at the Hilton Short Hills and plan to return. With a great location, extensive accommodations and services the Hilton Short Hills has plenty to offer. Have you ever been? I’m sure you’ll want to visit now!

T.S.

 

 

Accessories art Beauty fashion Fashion exhibit Jewlery shoes The Museum at FIT

FIT’s School of Art and Design Graduating Exhibition

FIT Museum

Recently on display at the Museum at FIT was the work and thesis projects of the graduating class of 2017. Many know FIT is a prestigious school for fashion, but it also teaches many of the arts. The exhibition showcased students work from all sixteen major areas of study. The exhibition was showcased in various areas of the museum and the school itself.

Accessories Design

For their final steps to achieving their degree’s students were instructed to create a collection around the concept of  ” Design Perspective”. Each took on a different interpretation to create their collections. Students used research on consumers, seasons, and inspirations to bring them to life. They created pieces belonging to either footwear, handbags, millinery (hats), or art. Every piece exhibited was judged and selected by FIT staff and fashion industry critics.

 

FIt Museum Museum at FIT Mujseum at FIT

 

Advertising Design

The students of advertising design were to creating content that reaches today’s public. Not only do these final projects advertise a product , they become one with the consumer. The students created experiences, much like we are used to today. To bring out an emotion or thought, not simply an agreement to buy. The advertisements  reflect much of what is currently happening and resonates with exhibition viewers.

Museum at FIT Museum at FIT

Computer Animation and Interactive Media

Graduates from the computer animation and interactive media program also focused on engaging with the viewer. They created apps, games,  environments and more that integrated their knowledge of technology design. This particular class used many personal experiences and social causes in their work. Race, sexuality, religion and how they felt about these topics came across in these pieces.

Museum at FIT

Fabric Styling

The class in fabric styling forecasted the color story of Summer/ Spring 2018. Through market research, trend forecasting and four colors they showcased the latest in women’s wear and home décor. Much of the public does not realize how ahead of time forecasters like these students are. Their work is continually a year ahead of its time.

Fashion Design

Fashion Design students used their expertise with fashion design art, CAD, journaling, and art portfolio to create their final designs. Their work was critiqued and selected by industry critics, guest designers and professors who mentored these students. On the judging day the selecteded looks were included in the BFA Future of Fashion runway show. Once the looks were selected the students work with experienced models for their final fittings. Students in the individual categories of Children’s Wear, Intimate Apparel, Knitwear, Special Occasion and Sportswear showcased their looks in the fashion show. Through these steps the students’ personal take on fashion design evolved and prepared them for their careers.

FIT Museum Museum at FIT Museum at FIT

 

Fine Arts

Fine Arts graduates were tasked with answering the question “How does a young artist create work that is relevant in our  contemporary culture?” Their work answered this question by adding their personal experience’s and identity to demonstrate advertising, consumerism, environmental issues, and social media. The proximity to multiple museums in NYC helped them cultivate their thoughts and creative process. They are now able to create fine art relevant to the ever changing society.

 

Museum at FIT

 

Graphic Design

Graphic design students were to write their thesis exploring the past, present and future on the topic they chose. Through the use of graphic media the students expressed their thoughts. With the images and words they selected they offered a fresh perspective on what’s occurring in today’s society. All the work displayed was critiqued by professionals in graphic design.

Musuem at FIT Museum at FIT Museum at FIt

Illustration

Students of the illustration program used their traditional and digital art media experience to creatively problem solve. The issue being how to create images for commercial distribution that targets specific audiences. Through their personal style, technique, expression and body of work cultivated at FIT they were able to solve the issue.

Museum at FIT Museum at FIT Museum at FIT

Interior Design

The class of interior design took their education in problem solving, space planning  and research to create their own perspectives. Their perspectives and the issues of sustainability, culture and constructions helped them create their thesis. The objective was to create interiors that looked great and spoke to the viewers. Unlike other students Interior design students created their final projects with aesthetic, functional and program constraints. To work around these limitations they used materials, colors and furnishings to create their interior design stories.

Museuma at FIT museum at FIT

Jewelry Design

Jewelry Design graduates created jewelry with design, craft, economics and ethics in mind. They also thought of sustainability and social responsibility when creating their pieces. They used both modern and ancient techniques to create their jewelry. Their work is to be viewed as both jewelry and individual works of art.

Musuem at FIT Museum at FIT

 

 

Menswear

The menswear graduating class created their final thesis much like a tailor makes suits.  They showcased their designs in their portfolios to their class during a presentation. Next they created their muslin, a plain white fabric designers use to create the base of their designs. Once their muslins were criticized and reworked they began the final process. Finished fabrics and tailoring techniques were then used to create their final menswear pieces. Finally their work was critiqued by well known menswear designers and put on display. Past graduating classes have been critiqued by John Varvatos, Italo Zucchelli for Calvin Klein and John Bartlett.

 

 

Packing Design

The students of the packing design program worked to advance the principals wing branding and packing design. They used innovative techniques to reach the consumers of food, beverage and home products. They also created designs to speak to packing designs to reach the consumers of beauty, personal care and technology products. They were tasked to create the designs within the constraints of conceptual development, graphic execution, production and compliance requirements.  They also took into account marketing and what would be their competition.

Museum at FIT Museum at FIT

Photography

Students of the graduating photography class expressed political views, fashion trends, and emotions. They also used documentary photography and  their personal experiences with family and their childhood to inspire their final captures.Their photography much like those of regarded professional photographers have the ability to impact the societal culture of the present and future.

FIT museum

Textile/Surface Design

Textile/Surface Design students created textiles of painted, woven, and screen printed techniques. They implemented classical forms of textile creation with innovative new technologies. They created their own aesthetics within the requirements of the textile industry. Their final pieces showcase the students ability to create new textiles that are creative, full of required techniques and its ability to be  marketable.

Museumat FIT Museum at FIT Mueseum at FIT

Toy Design

The class of Toy Design uses imagination to help develop kids self -image. Students created toys that help create a healthy lifestyle of play. Their toys also challenge critical thinking in the child who plays with them. Students incorporated community issues, culture, nature into their interactive children’s games. The toys ranged from stuffed animals, board games, digital worlds and more.

Muesuma t FIt Museum at FIt

 

Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design

The Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design program focuses on the ability create environments that inspire, inform and persuade the viewer. Students created life size mock ups of events such as a retail space, display, museum exhibition, event or individual place. The students process included the design process and market analysis with the help of industry experts. Their designs were reviewed in an exhibition and finally developed digitally and physically.

Musuem at FIT Museum at FIT

 

 

It was immensely interesting to see what the future of the creative fields have in store. There is no shortage of creativity with students like these and the colleges that mold them into productive creators. As I walked through the exhibition I was not only learning about these creative majors but remembering my own time in college. There are more details and hours that go into the final product of a creative industry than consumers and viewers realize.

T.S.

art fashion Fashion exhibit History Lifestyle shoes Uncategorized

The Museum at FIT’s Black Fashion Designers

Currently on display at the Museum of FIT is the “Black Fashion Designers” exhibition.  Just in time for Black history month the exhibition showcases both African and African American designers. Fashion ranging from the 1950’s to the present is on view, along with the history of challenges African American and African designers have faced within the fashion industry. The exhibition focuses on an array of classifications for these designers such as eveningwear, menswear, street style and six more categories.

Breaking into the Industry

As in most of the U.S.A during the 1950’s the fashion industry was a segregated profession. Taught the craft of sewing primarily by a loved one the inclusion of Black designers into the industry only began slowly during  the 1960’s. During this time some designers were able to learn the business side of the fashion industry while they worked in Seventh Avenue manufactures. Ann Loewe was taught sewing by her grandmother a former slave. Her designs became well known by the American wealthy in the 1950’s and 1960’s. Her specialty were wedding gowns and debutante dresses for the elite.

Museum of FIT

Left:Anne Loews wedding dress 1968. Right Ethiopian designer Amsale wedding dress fall 2016

 

The Rise of the Black Fashion Designer

The Civil Rights movement, music and African American culture became prevalent in influencing the fashion of the day. Disco music and the African American musicians inspired the designs of the 1970’s. Their designs were beginning to influence not only New York fashion but that of Paris and London.

 

Museum of FIT

James Daugherty green jumpsuit 1974 and Jon Higgins dress 1980-85

 

 

Eveningwear

The 19th century was an important time for Black fashion designers in the eveningwear arena. Their use of different techniques and craftsmanship afforded them the opportunities to dress elite clientele like Princess Diana and Beyoncé. The attention from high end retailers such as Bergdorf Goodman had African and African American designs being sold on Fifth Ave.

FIT Museum

Ann Lowe 1955 dress and B.Michae 2015 silk brocade dress.

                          

Street Influence

During the 1980’s Hip Hop and it’s culture influenced the trends of fashion. The use of oversized jackets and pants were being used by the youth of New York City. What the fashion industry call’s the ” trickle up” movement  of street style influencing the runway occurred. This movement shook the fashion industry into recognizing the market of hip hop and its youth. Unfortunately this led to high end designers being influenced by the movement without crediting the originators of the trend. Although this has slowly changed and the trickle up movement is now more appropriately used by design houses such as “Public School”. ” Public School” streetwear and high fashion fusions often stump critics and is hard to define on weather it is streetwear or not. Designer Virgil Abloh of the brand “Off-White” uses streetwear to express issues in society like climbing the corporate ladder. His purpose in making streetwear is to add an intellectual layer to a style of clothing that is often seen as cheap.

FIT Museum Exhbit

Pyre Moss fall 2015 and Off -White Ensemble 2015

FIT Musem Exhibit

Right: Public School Fall 2016. Left Xuly.Bet Fall 2016.Off White Ensemble Fall 2015 .

 

Activism

Activism in the African American society has given designers a chance to showcase their designs while infusing their culture and message. Activism prompted designers to revive the Afro hairstyle and traditional African textiles. The use of fashion allowed these designers to express their frustrations and hopes during times of oppression. Activism and fashion have collided expressing certain messages important to the designers and the public. As it was used in the past by African American communities as an outlet of social injustice it is also used today. We’ve seen particular clothing and  accessories like hats to convey a social injustice message in the Women’s March and on the runway. Most recently in the Missoni closing of their Fall 2017 Ready To Wear collection.

The Mueseum of FIT

Left: Patrick Kelly denim dress 1987. Above Patrick Kelly t-shirt. Right: Stoned Cherrie T-shirt and Tsonga skirt 2010.

Menswear

During the late 1970’s black designers were making an imprint in menswear both in the US and in London. Andrew Ramroop was the first black designer to work on the famous Savile Row in London.  Meanwhile designer Jeffrey Banks infused American prep style with traditional colorful tweeds in New York. In the early 2000’s elaborate suits fit for royalty were combined with street flare on the Sean John runway. Menswear continues to be pushed by black designers as they change proportions, add new designs and play with the idea of masculinity in suits.

FIT Museun

Patrick Kelly 1989

FIt Museum

Casey- Hayford fall 2015. Agi & Sam fall 215

FIT Museum

Sean John Fall 2008. Maurice Sewell 2003

 

Black Models

During the 1950’s Ebony magazine began the ” Ebony Fashion Fair”. The fair discovered and launched the career of supermodel Pat Cleveland among others.  It was one of the only platforms or magazine’s besides “Jet” magazine showcasing black models. African American designers were also given a spotlight to showcase their designs during the fair. In 1973 the fashion show ” The Battle of Versailles” a fundraiser for the restoration of the Versailles Palace featured five American ready to wear designers and five French couturier’s. It not only gave the American designers recognition but featured ten black models. The freedom of movement given to the models made an impact on what a model was allowed to do on the runway. Black models have been muses for designers like Stephen burrows and Azzadine Alana in the 1990’s. Model Alva Chinn became a favorite of Oscar de la Renta, Halston and Stephen Burrows. Although there are more models of color on the runway now, they are still in the minority. Supermodel Liya Kebede has given back to her native Kenya by working with the World Health Organization. They have given Ethiopian weavers a platform to showcase their work and contribute to the  Ethiopian economy.

Come des Garcons jacket, Azzedine Alaia bustier and pants. Pierre Hardy shoes. Styled by model Veronica Webb. Iemlem by Liya Kebede spring 2014

Ebony Magazine 1974 ” The Big Whirl of Fashion” featuring their fashion fair.

US Vogue and Vogue Italia

 

African Influence

African culture has inspired many designers, but can be interpreted in an incorrect manner. For an African American designer the ability to interpret  African influence in their designs is a chance to explore and portray their heritage with respect and understanding. Nigerian designer Lisa Folawiyo adds modern touches to the Ankara, a traditional West African fabric. The designer has been known to add custom prints and embellishments to the fabric in her collections.  Scarification an ancient African tradition is one of  the influences for designer Mimi Plange. The influences of scars can be seen in her 2013 leather curved line dress. While designer Christie Brown uses traditional African textiles to design modern clothing.

Left :Patrick Kelly 1988. Right Stella Jean 2015

Middle: Mimi Plange
Right: Christie Brown
Left: Lisa Folawiyo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Experimentation

Designer Jon Watson known for dressing the contestants of  beauty pageants experimented with silhouettes. In the late 1950’s he stepped away from his traditional hourglass form to an innovative pleated evening coat. It was innovative because it stood away from the body reflecting Parisian couture. Designer Brenda Waites experimented with 13th century techniques such as macramé knotting in her 1970’s collection. Punk and British tailoring were combined in designer Joe Casely-Hayford’s 2000 collection. He as well as most Black designers fight against the label of “black designer” for the more appropriate “designer” label.

Left:Jon Weston coat 1957
Middle: Brenda Waites Boiling tunic 1970’s
Right: Bryan Lars Union suit 1987

Left” Epperson dress 2008
Right: Joe Casely-Hayford 2000 Ensemble

 

The exhibition is open until May 16, 2017 at the Museum of FIT on 7th Ave and 27th St. Let me know if you got to visit this exhibition.

T.S.

fashion History shoes The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Met’s Masterworks: Unpacking Fashion

Currently at the Met’s Costume Institute is Masterworks: Unpacking Fashion. Visitors are given a peek into the Costume Institutes archives from the eighteenth century to twenty first. Not only has the museum acquired one of the largest collections in the world but one that includes Masterworks. Masterworks are labeled as such due to the garment ‘s technical qualities that have pushed the process of garment making forward. The qualities that deemed each piece a masterwork changed as eras progressed. Curators chose pieces that complemented each other no matter the time period. Essentially showing how fashion reacts to the past, present and future.

18th Century Masterworks: Quality of Materials

During the 1800’s the craftsmanships of embroidery, textiles, weaves and tailoring are what constitute masterwork. As the silhouettes of garments did not change much during this period it was the use of intricate techniques that made them masterworks. The Robe Volant, or one piece gown with a tight bodice, flowing front and back pleats was the typical style worn by women and girls. During this time the reference to lingerie  through  fuller proportions was seen as indecent and as a result so was the wearer. The shape was also frowned upon as people believed pregnancies due to affairs could be hidden. The simple silhouettes allowed the detailed damask or brocade prints to be the showcase of the garment. The making of a garment was through the process of draping fabric on a bodice and folding pleats rather than cutting and sewing.

Fashion

Robe Volant 1730 French and Robe A La Francaise 1760

 

Men’s attire for this period was inspired by new trade relations between Britain and Asia. An influx of new materials and styles such as silk and kimonos originated from China, India, Persia and Turkey changed the fashion of Europe. All of these cultures inspired the Banyan a casual house gown worn by British men. Depending on details like fit, cut or quilting they would be adorned at home or out at casual events. This coat’s European silhouette combined with Asian materials and styles was seen as elegant and fashionable. Men who wore a Banyan were considered well traveled with great fashion sense. Again simple lines and tailoring were used allowing detailed embroidery, bold patterns and bright colors to be the focus point of the garment.

fashion

British Blue Banyan 1760-70 and Red Suit 1770-80

During this same time period French fashion was pushing the boundaries and blurring the lines on what was acceptable for women to wear. Striped prints took the place of embroidery, a trend influenced by Asian relations. The print now being used for both female and male attire was previously associated with socially excluded populations. Men’s riding coats, cape collar and lapels were some of the masculine trends implemented into the Redingote or women’s dresses. To the dismay of  French magazines and their progressive efforts the public viewed the this trend as a perverse mixing of gender roles.

historical fashion

1790s Men tailcoat and 1787 Women’s Redingote

19th Century Masterworks: Technical developments in tools and speed and changes in  silhouettes

This century saw quick changes in a garment’s silhouette as opposed to the 18th century, which relied on materials to progress fashion. The use of bustles, crinolines and corsets was introduced drastically changing the form of a woman’s body. Technical abilities in cutting and sewing progressed with the introduction of the Jacard loom and the sewing machine. These tools allowed for garments to be made faster, cheaper and created ready-made or ready to wear accessibility. During this period the introduction of  Haute Couture by designer Charles Fredrick Worth was also pushing fashion forward. His tradition of labeling his pieces introduced the notion that a designer was a creator and artist.

fashion

Paul Poiret Opera Coat 1911

Fashion History

House of Worth 1898

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Twentieth Century Masterworks: Innovation and Reinvention

War World One like many other aspects of society affected fashion. Simple garments with less body restrictions was the norm. Haute Couture masters such as Paul Poiret and  Madeleine Vionnet embraced the uncorseted frame by using the draping method. As usual fashion and art intertwined with the surrealist movement inspiring collections by Elsa Schiaparelli and Charles James. As some designers looked to the future others looked to the past. Jeanne Lanvin’s mid-eighteenth  century inspired pieces included techniques used in the 1800’s. Techniques such as simpler silhouettes with bold embroidery and prints were used again .

Left:Madeleine Vionnet 1929 Haute Couture, inspired by the past and future fashion.
Right: John Galliano Spring/Summer 1999. Inspired by Madeline Vionnet gowns.

Fashion

Both House of Lanvin Haute Couture
Left: Traviata Robe De Style Winter 1928. Right Robe De Style 1926-27

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Late Twentieth Century Masterworks: Cultural Combinations, Youth Dominance and Couture’s Survival

At this point in fashion the popularity of Haute Couture was waning as the boom of ready to wear excelled. Designers like Yves Saint Laurent guided couture into relevancy by combining traditional couture elegance and modern street style. Cristobal Balenciaga  looked to the past and continued implementing 17th century structures with modern details. While punk visionary Vivienne Westwood lead the uprise of deconstructive fashion. Influences for her 1970’s,80’s and continuous collections included the fashion of the 17th-19th centuries.

Historical fashion

Left : Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche Spring Summer 2014. Right Yves Saint Laurent 1971. The Rive Gauche line by YSL used inspiration from the 40s.

Fashion History

Chicago Jacket by House of Dior by Yves Saint Laurent Autumn/Winter 1960-61. Referenced a moto jacket but couture made.

 

 

Contemporary Masterworks: Rebellion, Expression of the times, Garments with multiple meanings

Masters of the moment included Hussein Charlatan, Martin Margiela, Yohji Yamamoto, Issey Miyake and Alexander McQueen. The advancement of the deconstructive technique by Margiela unveiled the intricate details of the construction of a garment. A process normally only seen by the designer. The use of unconventional materials was introduced and paired with traditional couture techniques. Materials like porcelain and wood were transformed and conformed to a women’s shape. By doing this designers expanded the relationship between a women’s body and clothing as well as peoples traditional ideas of fashion. Pop culture, politics and perceptions were also questioned and applied to the creation of a garment. From my recollection of my college days even the  history of a country and its fashion inspired collections. Alexander McQueen and John Galliano both designed the traditional corset with  progressive materials like coiled wire.

Fashion

Yarmoto 2006-2007 Black silk, plastic and cashmere wool bustier. Issey Miake 1880-81 red molded polyester resin and cellulose nitrate bustier

history fashion

Pannier hooped petticoat 1760-70.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Harold Koda Gift

Curators are preservers of art who expand the lifespan of each piece. By doing so they allow art to live beyond its prime and introduce generations of observers to a historical world. This is what Harold Koda did as Curator in Charge at the Costume Institute for fifteen years before retiring in January of 2016. In tribute to him current Curator in Charge Andrew Bolton and Met Trustee Anna Wintour commissioned thirty designers to donate selections of their archives to the Met. Each  piece chosen held significance for Honda and found a purposeful position in the existing collection. Designers recalled their admiration and relationship with Koda that was cultivated through collaborations for the Costume Institute.

Fashion History

Philip Treacy “Paphiopedilum Philippines Hat. Spring/Summer 2000

Historical Fashion

Maison Margiela by John Galliano Coat Dress 2015-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The exhibit gives an inside look at how fashion continues to be influenced by history. It showcases how innovative designers find a way to move fashion forward with techniques of the past and future.  Masterworks:Unpacking Fashion will be on through February 4th 2017. Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000th 5th Ave, NY,NY,

T.S.

 

 

 

 

 

 

fashion shoes Uncategorized

Baldinini S/S 17 Unveiling

Last week I was invited to preview Baldinini S/S 17 collection at their brand new showroom in the flatiron district in NYC. On display was their newest collection as well as the capsule Gimmi Bladinini collection. Designed by Gimmi Baldinini and his daughter and made in Italy, the collection ranges from sporty comfort to Cinderella chic giving everyone something to love.

Sporty

The inspiration of the sport of racing can be seen in the enamel checkered print heels and bags. The use of reflective metal details seems to be directly taken from that of a chrome wheel. The combination of sleek lines, patent leather, sensible heel height and feminine lace makes the shoes fun yet elegant.

 

Sneakers and mini backpacks give the collection a futuristic yet classic feel. The classic athletic running sneaker was revamped with studs and reflective details. Classic colors and materials like black lace add feminine touches to sporty classics.

Heels and sandals get sporty details with metal rivets, perforated leather like that of a sports jersey and accent stitching seen in sports cars. Braid like details inspired by tires are refined with gold trim in their slide sandals and platforms.

 

 

Mod yet Modern

Mixed prints of lips, floral, hearts and geometric shapes give classic leather bags, heels and espadrilles a fun twist. The patchwork like purses and wood sandals feel retro but modern with patent leather, sleek lines and silver hardware. Painted floral motifs on chunky heels and bags in pastels and bold colors reflect a 60’s and 70’s color scheme. Baldinini’s attention to detail can be seen in their floral etched platforms and leather accent stitched  mules. While the braided detail continues to tie the collection together.

 

 

Desert Chic

Olive green gladiator sandals with gold stitches and tassel accents combine utility and glamour. Crocheted medallions and Baldinini’s detailed heel modernizes the summer staple sandal. Espadrilles in classic animal prints and modern metallic tie into the collection with gold and black details. Sling backs and slide sandals have subtle touches of glamour with crystals and high sheen materials. While a gold and white mesh pump are perfect for Cinderella herself.

 

 

 

 

Baldinini has expanded into the U.S. market with new locations on the east coast. After a successful grand opening in New Jersey’s Short Hills Mall they have opened a store in Roosevelt Field Mall in Long Island, NY. Florida also has a Baldinini location in Miami’s Bicknell City Centre Mall near Saks Fifth Ave. As an appreciator of the art that is fashion I love Baldinini’s attention to detail. From the sole of the heels to the trim there is no lack of intricacy. Baldinini also realizes the art of a well made shoe and in conjunction with the University of Bologna, Italy is organizing and archiving Baldinini shoes to create a  company museum. Personally as a art loving fashionista I hope to visit this museum one day. Learn more about Baldinini in my previous post when I visited the grand opening of their Short Hills location here. You can also find their previous collection’s and prices on their website Here.

I always love working with Baldinini and their lovely PR girls who chatted with me in Italian and Spanish as they answered all my questions. It is impossible for me to chose a favorite out of the spring/summer ’17 collection and hopefully I won’t have to.

Ciao loves!

T.S.